Materials and Structures

, Volume 43, Issue 5, pp 709–718 | Cite as

Abrasion resistance and mechanical properties of high-volume fly ash concrete

Original Article

Abstract

The abrasion resistance and mechanical properties of concrete containing high-volume fly ash (HVFA) were investigated. Sand (fine aggregate) was replaced with 35, 45, and 55% of Class F fly ash by mass. The water to cement ratio and the workability of mixtures were maintained constant at 0.46 and 55 ± 5 mm respectively. Properties examined were compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity and abrasion resistance expressed as depth of wear. Test results indicated that replacement of sand with fly ash enhanced the 28-day compressive strength by 25–41%, splitting tensile strength by 12–21%, flexural strength by 14–17%, and modulus of elasticity by 18–23% depending upon the fly ash content, and showed continuous improvement in mechanical properties up to the ages of 365 days. Replacing fly ash with sand significantly improved the abrasion resistance of concrete at all ages. Strong correlation exists between the abrasion resistance and each of the mechanical properties investigated.

Keywords

Abrasion resistance Concrete High-volume fly ash (HVFA) Mechanical properties 

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Copyright information

© RILEM 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringThapar UniversityPatialaIndia
  2. 2.Construction and Infrastructure, School of Engineering and the Built EnvironmentUniversity of WolverhamptonWolverhamptonUK

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