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Cereal Research Communications

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 809–816 | Cite as

Grain quality and baking value of perennial rye (cv. “Perenne”) of interspecific origin (Secale cereale x. S. montanum)

  • L. Füle
  • G. Hódos-Kotvics
  • Z. Galli
  • E. Ács
  • L. Heszky
Article

Abstract

The aim of the project was to determine the grain quality, technological properties and baking values of ’Perenne’ (registered perennial rye cultivar), obtained through the interspecific crossing of Secale cereale L. and S. montanum Guss., and to compare with annual rye varieties. The crude protein content of ’Perenne’ grains was higher (’Perenne’: 18%, annual varieties: 12%) and contained more crude fibre, crude fat and ash than the annual varieties. Regarding the quantity and composition of amino acids, ’Perenne’ showed values between S. montanum (high amino acid content) and S. cereale (lower amino acid content). While its farinograph softening value was inferior to those of the annual varieties, its flour mixed with wheat flour outperformed them. In terms of other properties (falling number, farinograph water absorption capacity, baking test) of ’Perenne’ flour, whether in mixtures or in pure form, was not left behind the annual varieties. Perennial rye can also be used for bread making since it has great grain composition.

Key words

perennial rye grain quality falling number baking values amino acids 

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest 2005

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Füle
    • 1
  • G. Hódos-Kotvics
    • 1
  • Z. Galli
    • 2
  • E. Ács
    • 3
  • L. Heszky
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Genetics and Plant BreedingSzent István UniversityGödöllőHungary
  2. 2.HAS-SIU Research Group for Molecular Plant BreedingGödöllőHungary
  3. 3.Cereal Research Non-Profit CompanySzegedHungary

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