Advertisement

Chemical Papers

, Volume 69, Issue 6, pp 881–888 | Cite as

Comparison of selected aroma compounds in cultivars of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.)

  • Eva Vítová
  • Kateřina Sůkalová
  • Martina Mahdalová
  • Lenka Butorová
  • Marcela Melikantová
Original Paper

Abstract

Thirteen cultivars of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) berries: Aromat, Botanicky, Buchlovicky, Hergo, Krasavica, Leicora, Ljubitelna, Pavlovsky, Peterbursky, Sluničko, Trofinovsky, Vitaminnaja and Velkoosecky, were tested for the content of volatile aroma compounds using gas chromatography with the solid phase microextraction method during two consequent years (2012–2013). In total, 69 volatile compounds were identified: 26 alcohols, 12 aldehydes, 11 ketones, 9 acids and 11 esters. Based on principal component analysis, 18 most relevant compounds, best representing the variability of the whole system and suitable for the discrimination of the samples, were selected from all compounds identified. These compounds were then compared using the analysis of variance to confirm differences between the samples. Significant (p < 0.05) differences were found in the varieties in both years, Krasavica and Sluničko cultivars were found to be quite different from other varieties, being rich in the compounds identified and containing most of the selected compounds. Variability within the cultivars (between picking years) was low or not significant.

Keywords

sea buckthorn aroma compounds flavour GC SPME 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Beveridge, T., Li, T. S. C., Oomah, B.D., & Smith, A. (1999) Sea buckthorn products: Manufacture and composition. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 47, 3480–3488.DOI:  10.1021/jf981331m.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Cakir, A. (2004) Essential oil and fatty acid composition of the fruits of Hippophae rhamnoides L. (Sea Buckthorn) and Myrtus communis L. from Turkey. Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, 32, 809–816.DOI:  10.1016/j.bse.2003.11.010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chauhan, A. S., Rekha, M. N., Ramteke, R. S. P., & Eipeson, W. E. (2003) Seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides Lin.) berries: Harnessing its potential for processing. Journal of Food Science and Technology-Mysore, 40, 349–356.Google Scholar
  4. Dulf, F. V. (2012) Fatty acids in berry lipids of six sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L., subspecies carpatica) cultivars grown in Romania. Chemistry Central Journal, 6, 106. DOI:  10.1186/1752-153x-6-106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Hirvi, T., & Honkanen, E. (1984) The aroma of the fruit of sea Buckthorn, Hippophae rhamnoides L. Zeitschrift für Lebensmittel-Untersuchung und Forschung, 179, 387–388.DOI:  10.1007/bf01043436.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Li, T. S. C., & Beveridge, T. H. J. (2003) Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.): Production and utilization. Ottawa, Canada: NRC Research Press.Google Scholar
  7. Li, T. S. C., & Schroeder, W. R. (1996) Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.): A multipurpose plant. HortTechnology, 6, 370–380.Google Scholar
  8. Schmarr, H. G., & Bernhardt, J. (2010) Profiling analysis of volatile compounds from fruits using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and image processing techniques. Journal of Chromatography A, 1217, 565–574.DOI:  10.1016/j.chroma.2009.11.063.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Socaci, S. A., Socaciu, C., Tofana, M., Rai, I. V., & Pintea, A. (2013) In-tube extraction and GC-MS analysis of volatile components from wild and cultivated sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. ssp. Carpatica) berry varieties and juice. Phytochemical Analysis, 24, 319–328.DOI:  10.1002/pca.2413.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Suryakumar, G., & Gupta, A. (2011) Medicinal and therapeutic potential of Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.). Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 138, 268–278.DOI:  10.1016/j.jep.2011.09.024.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Tang, X., Kälviäinen, N., & Tuorila, H. (2001) Sensory and hedonic characteristics of juice of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) origins and hybrids. LWT — Food Science and Technology, 34, 102–110.DOI:  10.1006/fstl.2000.0751.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Tiitinen, K. M., Hakala, M. A., & Kallio, H. P. (2005) Quality components of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) varieties. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 53, 1692–1699.DOI:  10.1021/jf0484125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Tiitinen, K., Hakala, M., & Kallio, H. (2006) Headspace volatiles from frozen berries of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) varieties. European Food Research and Technology, 223, 455–460.DOI:  10.1007/s00217-005-0224-6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Vítová, E., Divišová, R., Sůkalová, K., & Matějíček, A. (2013) Determination and quantification of volatile compounds in fruits of selected elderberry cultivars grown in Czech Republic. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research, 52, 1–11.Google Scholar
  15. Wang, S. L., Liu, L. P., Jiao, L. X., & Fan, M. T. (2011) Volatile profile of sea buckthorn wines, raw juices and must in Qinghai (China). International Journal of Food Properties, 14, 776–785.DOI:  10.1080/10942910903420750.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Yang, B., & Kallio, H. (2002) Composition and physiological effects of sea buckthorn (Hippophae) lipids. Trends in Food Science & Technology, 13, 160–167.DOI:  10.1016/s0924-2244(02)00136-x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Zeb, A. (2004) Important therapeutic uses of Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae): A review. Journal of Biological Sciences, 4, 687–693.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Institute of Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eva Vítová
    • 1
  • Kateřina Sůkalová
    • 1
  • Martina Mahdalová
    • 1
  • Lenka Butorová
    • 1
  • Marcela Melikantová
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food Chemistry and Biotechnology, Faculty of ChemistryBrno University of TechnologyBrnoCzech Republic

Personalised recommendations