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Acta Geophysica

, Volume 64, Issue 4, pp 943–962 | Cite as

Magnetic and Electromagnetic Signatures around Polile Tshisa Hot Spring in the Northern Neotectonic Belt in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

  • Kakaba Madi
  • Peter K. Nyabeze
  • Oswald Gwavava
  • Matome Sekiba
  • Baojin Zhao
Open Access
Article
  • 106 Downloads

Abstract

Finding productive boreholes in the Karoo fractured aquifers has never been an easy task. Fractured Karoo aquifers in the neotectonic zones in the Eastern Cape Province can be targeted for groundwater exploration. The Polile Tshisa hot spring is located in a seismo-tectonic region beset by neotectonics. Hot springs are indicative of circulation of groundwater at great depths along fault zones, and accordingly of neotectonics. The characterisation of hot springs by means of magnetic and electromagnetic methods can help infer the occurrence of structures which are favourable for groundwater potential. The Polile Tshisa hot spring is characterised by faults, fractures, and dolerite dykes. All these structures make the hot spring a good case study for groundwater exploration.

Key words

neotectonics electromagnetic groundwater hot springs Karoo 

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Copyright information

© Madi et al. 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kakaba Madi
    • 1
  • Peter K. Nyabeze
    • 2
  • Oswald Gwavava
    • 1
  • Matome Sekiba
    • 2
  • Baojin Zhao
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of GeologyUniversity of Fort HareAliceSouth Africa
  2. 2.Geophysics UnitCouncil for GeosciencePretoriaSouth Africa
  3. 3.Worley Parsons TWPJohannesburgSouth Africa

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