Endocrine

, Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 223–230 | Cite as

Gap junctional connexin 37 is expressed in sheep ovaries

  • Ewa Borowczyk
  • Mary Lynn Johnson
  • Jerzy J. Bilski
  • Pawel Borowicz
  • Dale A. Redmer
  • Lawrence P. Reynolds
  • Anna T. Grazul-Bilska
Original Articles

Abstract

The objective of current study was to evaluate the expression of Cx37 in ovarian follicles and in corpora lutea (CL) during the estrous cycle in sheep. Ovine Cx37 was cloned and characterized to design speciesspecific probe and primers. In Exp. 1, ovaries were collected on d 13, 14, 15, and 16 of the estrous cycle, or from FSH-induced ewes at 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h after hCG treatment on d 15 of the estrous cycle. In Exps. 2 and 3, CL were collected on d 5, 10, and 15 of the estrous cycle, or at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h after prostaglandin F (PGF)-induced luteal regression on d 10 of the estrous cycle, respectively. Ovarian tissues (e.g., granulosa cells, theca cells, ovarian follicles, and/or CL) were used for Cx37 immunostaining followed by image analysis or for determination of Cx37 mRNA expression by real-time RT-PCR. We demonstrated that (1) Cx37 protein was expressed in granulosa and cumulus oocyte complex compartments, ovarian blood vessels, and on the luteal cell borders, (2) expression of Cx37 mRNA was greater in granulosa than in theca cells of prevulatory follicles, (3) Cx37 mRNA expression in granulosa but not theca cells was affected by hCG treatment, (4) Cx37 protein and mRNA expression were dependent on the stage of luteal development, and (5) Cx37 expression changed during PGF-induced luteal regression. Thus, Cx37 may play a role in follicular development and ovulation as well as in luteal tissue growth, differentiation, and regression.

Key Words

Connexin 37 gap junctions ovarian follicles corpora lutea sheep 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ewa Borowczyk
    • 3
  • Mary Lynn Johnson
    • 3
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jerzy J. Bilski
    • 3
  • Pawel Borowicz
    • 3
    • 2
  • Dale A. Redmer
    • 3
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lawrence P. Reynolds
    • 3
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anna T. Grazul-Bilska
    • 3
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Cell Biology CenterNorth Dakota State UniversityFargo
  2. 2.Center for Nutrition and PregnancyNorth Dakota State UniversityFargo
  3. 3.Department of Animal and Range SciencesNorth Dakota State UniversityFargo

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