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Endocrine

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 193–197 | Cite as

Endogenous excitatory amino acid neurotransmission regulates thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid hormone secretion in conscious freely moving male rats

  • M. C. Arufe
  • R. Durán
  • D. Perez-Vences
  • M. Alfonso
Article

Abstract

The role of neurotransmission of endogenous excitatory amino acid (EAA) on serum thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels was examined in conscious and freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were cannulated at the third ventricle 2 d before the experiments. Several glutamate receptor agonists, such as kainic acid and domoic acid, and antagonists, such as 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and dizocilpine (MK-801) were administered into the third ventricle. Serum TSH levels were assesed by radioimmunoassay, and serum thyroid hormone levels were assessed by enzyme immunoassay. The results showed that the administration of CNQX and MK-801 produced a decrease in serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones. The administration of kainic acid and domoic acid increased TSH concentrations, whereas CNQX completely blocked the release of TSH induced by kainic acid and domoic acid. These results suggest the importance of endogenous EAA in the regulation of hormone secretion from the pituitary-thyroid axis, as well as the role of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors in the stimulatory effect of EAAs on the pituitary-thyroid axis.

Key Words

Excitatory amino acids thyroid-stimulating hormone glutamate antagonist 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. C. Arufe
    • 1
  • R. Durán
    • 1
  • D. Perez-Vences
    • 1
  • M. Alfonso
    • 1
  1. 1.Departmento de Biología Funcional y Ciencias de la Salud, Area de Fisiología, Facultad de CienciasUniversidad de VigoVigoSpain

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