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Biological Trace Element Research

, Volume 80, Issue 3, pp 245–249 | Cite as

Trace metals in vertebral columns of deep-sea teleost fish

  • Masa-oki Yamada
  • Ken Fujimori
  • Gen Yamada
  • Yumi Moriwake
  • Setsuko Tohno
  • Yoshiyuki Tohno
Article

Abstract

Deep-sea teleost fish were collected from the Sagami Bay near a deep fissure in the Pacific Ocean. Fish were identified as Chlorophthalmis albatrosis, Engyprosopan xystrias, Satyrichthys hians, Ventrifossa garmani, and Halieutaea stellata. The Etmopterus lucifer is not a teleost, but a deepsea shark. Just after being caught and fixed in neutral 20% formol, the vertebral column was resected and prepared for measurement by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

Trace elements were found to be Al, Si, Ti, Fe, Cu, Cd, Zn, and Hg at micrograms per gram levels. Major elements were Mg, Ca, P, and S at the milligram per gram level. Some of trace elements, Zn and Hg, were also usually found at this level.

Index Entries

Trace metal Zn Hg fish vertebra marine fish vertebra deep-sea teleost deep-sea shark 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masa-oki Yamada
    • 1
  • Ken Fujimori
    • 2
  • Gen Yamada
    • 3
  • Yumi Moriwake
    • 1
  • Setsuko Tohno
    • 1
  • Yoshiyuki Tohno
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of AnatomyNara Medical UniversityKashihara, NaraJapan
  2. 2.Institute for Tropic Biosphere Research CenterRyukyu UniversityUehara, OkinawaJapan
  3. 3.Center for Animal Resources and DevelopmentKumamoto UniversityKumamotoJapan

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