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Biological Trace Element Research

, Volume 104, Issue 3, pp 275–284 | Cite as

Microcalorimetric studies of the action of Er3+ on Halobacterium halobium R1 growth

  • Liu Peng
  • Liu Yi
  • Xie Zhixiong
  • Hou Anxin
  • Shen Ping
  • Qu Songsheng
Article

Abstract

A microcalorimetric technique was used to evaluate the influence of Er3+ on Halobacterium halobium R1 growth. By means of a LKB-2277 Bioactivity Monitor ampoule method, we obtained the thermogenic curves of H. halobium R1 growth at 37°C. In order to analyze the results, the relationship between k and C was obtained. The addition of Er3+ in low concentration cause a decrease of the maximum heat production P max and growth rate constants k; however, Er3+ in a high concentration might promote growth of H. halobium R1. When Er3+ is in a much higher concentration, the growth of H. halobium R1 is inhibited completely. For comparison, the shapes of H. halobium R1 cells were observed by means of transmission electron microscope (TEM). According to the thermogenic curves and TEM photos of H. halobium R1 under different conditions, it is clear that the metabolic mechanism of H. halobium R1 growth has been changed with the addition of Er3+.

Index Entries

Halobacterium halobium R1 Er3+ microcalorimetry thermokinetics 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liu Peng
    • 1
  • Liu Yi
    • 1
  • Xie Zhixiong
    • 2
  • Hou Anxin
    • 1
  • Shen Ping
    • 2
  • Qu Songsheng
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular SciencesWuhan UniversityWuhanPeople's Republic of China
  2. 2.School of Life SciencesWuhan UniversityWuhanPeople's Republic of China

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