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Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology

, Volume 131, Issue 1–3, pp 762–773 | Cite as

Biochar as a precursor of activated carbon

Session 4 Industrial Biobased Products

Abstract

Biochar was evaluated as a precursor of activated carbon. This product was produced by chemical activation using potassium hydroxide. The effects of operating conditions of activation process, such as temperature, activating agent to biochar mass ratio, and nitrogen flow rate, on the textural and chemical properties of the product were investigated. Activated carbon produced by this method has internal surface area at least 50 times than that of the precursor and is highly microporous, which is also confirmed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed development of aromatization in the structure of activated carbon. X-ray diffraction data indicated the formation of small, two-dimensional graphite-like structure at high temperatures. Thermogravimetric study showed that when potassium hydroxide to biochar mass ratio was more than one, the weight loss decreased.

Index Entries

Biochar activated carbon chemical activation potassium hydroxide 

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Copyright information

© Hamana Press Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratories, Department of Chemical EngineeringUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada

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