Obesity Surgery

, Volume 15, Issue 6, pp 813–819 | Cite as

Tissue Oxygenation in Obese and Non-obese Patients During Laparoscopy

  • Edith Fleischmann
  • Andrea Kurz
  • Monika Niedermayr
  • Karl Schebesta
  • Oliver Kimberger
  • Daniel I Sessler
  • Barbara Kabon
  • Gerhard Prager
Article

Background: Wound infection risk is inversely related to subcutaneous tissue oxygenation, which is reduced in obese patients and may be reduced even more during laparoscopic procedures. Methods: We evaluated subcutaneous tissue oxygenation (PsqO2) in 20 patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥40 kg/m2 (obese group) and 15 patients with BMI <30 kg/m2 (non-obese group) undergoing laparoscopic surgery with standardized anaesthesia technique and fluid administration. Arterial oxygen tension was maintained near 150 mmHg. PsqO2 was measured from a surrogate wound on the upper arm. Results: A mean FIO2 of 51% (13%) was required in obese patients to reach an arterial oxygen tension of 150 mmHg; however, a mean FIO2 of only 40% (7%) was required to reach the same oxygen tension in non-obese patients (P=0.007). PsqO2 was significantly less in obese patients: 41 (10) vs 57 (15) mmHg (P<0.001). Conclusion: Obese patients having laparoscopic surgery require a significantly greater FIO2 to reach an arterial oxygen tension of about 150 mmHg than non-obese patients; they also have significantly lower subcutaneous oxygen tensions. Both factors probably contribute to an increased infection risk in obese patients.

ANESTHESIA TISSUE OXYGENATION INFECTION SURGERY WOUND INFECTION MORBID OBESITY 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edith Fleischmann
    • Andrea Kurz
      • Monika Niedermayr
        • Karl Schebesta
          • Oliver Kimberger
            • Daniel I Sessler
              • Barbara Kabon
                • Gerhard Prager

                  There are no affiliations available

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