Chromatographia

, Volume 66, Issue 5–6, pp 377–382 | Cite as

Determination of Tetrachloroethylene and Other Volatile Halogenated Organic Compounds in Oil Wastes by Headspace SPME GC–MS

  • Daniele Fabbri
  • Roberto Bezzi
  • Cristian Torri
  • Paola Galletti
  • Emilio Tagliavini
Original

Abstract

Oil wastes and slops are complex mixtures of hydrocarbons, which may contain a variety of contaminants including tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) and other volatile halogenated organic compounds (VHOCs). The analytical determination of PCE at trace levels in petroleum-derived matrices is difficult to carry out in the presence of large amounts of hydrocarbon matrix components. In the following study, we demonstrate that headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with GC–MS analysis can be applied for the rapid measurement of PCE concentration in oil samples. The HS-SPME method was developed using liquid paraffin as matrix matching reference material for external and internal calibration and optimisation of experimental parameters. The limit of quantitation was 0.05 mg kg−1, and linearity was established up to 25 mg kg−1. The HS-SPME method was extended to several VHOCs, including trichloroethylene (TCE) in different matrices and was applied to the quantitative analysis of PCE and TCE in real samples.

Keywords

Gas chromatography Solid-phase microextraction Organochlorine solvents Oil residue 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Alma Petroli Ravenna is acknowledged for financial contribution within a joint research project with C.I.R.S.A. University of Bologna and for providing real samples of oil residues.

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlag/GWV Fachverlage GmbH 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniele Fabbri
    • 1
  • Roberto Bezzi
    • 1
  • Cristian Torri
    • 1
  • Paola Galletti
    • 1
  • Emilio Tagliavini
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Chemistry, C.I.R.S.AUniversity of BolognaRavennaItaly

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