Chromatographia

, Volume 63, Supplement 13, pp S67–S73 | Cite as

GC and GC-MS Studies on the Essential Oil and Thiophenes from Tagetes patula L.

  • Sz. Szarka
  • É. Héthelyi
  • É. Lemberkovics
  • I. N. Kuzovkina
  • P. Bányai
  • É. Szőke
Article

Abstract

The production and the composition of the compounds (mono-, sesquiterpenes and acetylenic thiophenes) obtained by the steam distillation of Tagetes patula L. have been investigated. The volatile oil was produced by steam distillation. GC was carried out on three types of stationary phase using flame ionization and mass selective detection. Percentage data were calculated by the area normalization method with very good repeatability (RSD below 5%). Oils from flower-heads were rich in β-caryophyllene (53.5%) and the leaves contained terpinolene in high concentration (21.1%). The main volatile component of the hairy roots and intact roots was 5-(3-buten-1-ynyl)-2,2'-bithienyl (BBT) yielding 28.5% and 44.0% in the oils. Three new minor constituents were identified as α-gurjunene, β-caryophyllene and (E)-β-farnesene. A flash chromatographic method was developed for the isolation of thiophenes from a solvent extract of intact roots. The collected fractions were screened by TLC and analyzed by GC-MS. Three thiophene fractions were obtained containing BBT, 5-(4-acetoxy-1-butynyl)-2,2'-bithienyl (BBTOAc) and 5-(4-hydroxy-1-butynyl)-2,2'-bithienyl (BBTOH).

Keywords

Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry Flash chromatography Tagetes patula L. Essential oil Acetylenic thiophenes 

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn/GWV Fachverlage GmbH 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sz. Szarka
    • 1
  • É. Héthelyi
    • 1
  • É. Lemberkovics
    • 1
  • I. N. Kuzovkina
    • 2
  • P. Bányai
    • 1
  • É. Szőke
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacognosySemmelweis UniversityBudapestHungary
  2. 2.Russian Academy of SciencesTimiryazev Institute of Plant PhysiologyMoscowRussia

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