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Chromatographia

, Volume 61, Issue 9–10, pp 527–531 | Cite as

Nonaqueous Capillary Electrophoretic Chiral Separations of Anticholinergic Drugs with Heptakis(2,3-di-O-Methyl-6-O-Sulfato)-β-Cyclodextrin

  • Du Guohua
  • Liu Qin
  • Xie Jianwei
  • Yun Liuhong
  • Zhong Bohua
  • Liu Keliang
Article

Abstract

This paper reports the use of an anionic cyclodextrin, heptakis(2,3-di-O-methyl-6-O-sulfato)-β-cyclodextrin (HDMS-β-CD), for chiral separations of pharmaceutical enantiomers by nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE). Enantiomer resolution was affected mainly by HDMS-β-CD concentration and the acidity of the background electrolyte (BGE). The effects of capillary length and applied voltage on enantiomer resolution were also investigated. Results showed that in a methanol solution of 20 mM phosphoric acid, 10 mM sodium hydroxide, and 10 mM HDMS-β-CD, seven anticholinergic drugs were separated to baseline but no chiral separation was obtained for three other similar drugs. NACE is suitable for routine, rapid separation of the enantiomers of pharmaceutical compounds.

Keywords

Nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis Methanol background electrolyte Enantiomer separations Heptakis(2,3-di-O-methyl-6-O-sulfato)-β-cyclodextrin Anticholinergic drugs 

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn/GWV Fachverlage GmbH 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Du Guohua
    • 1
  • Liu Qin
    • 1
  • Xie Jianwei
    • 1
  • Yun Liuhong
    • 1
  • Zhong Bohua
    • 1
  • Liu Keliang
    • 1
  1. 1.Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and ToxicologyBeijingChina

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