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Journal of Thermal Spray Technology

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 546–552 | Cite as

The effect of residual stress in HVOF tungsten carbide coatings on the fatigue life in bending of thermal spray coated aluminum

  • R. T. R. McGrann
  • D. J. Greving
  • J. R. Shadley
  • E. F. Rybicki
  • B. E. Bodger
  • D. A. Somerville
Reviewed Papers

Abstract

One factor that affects the suitability of tungsten carbide (WC) coatings for wear and corrosion control applications is the fatigue life of the coated part. Coatings, whether anodized or thermal spray coated, can reduce the fatigue life of a part compared to an uncoated part. This study compares the fatigue life of uncoated and thermal spray coated 6061 Al specimens. The relation between the residual stress level in the coating and the fatigue life of the specimen is investigated.

Cyclic bending tests were performed on flat, cantilever beam specimens. Applied loads placed the coating in tension. Residual stress levels for each of the coating types were determined experimentally using the modified layer removal method.

Test results show that the fatigue life of WC coated specimens is directly related to the level of compressive residual stress in the coating. In some cases, the fatigue life can be increased by a factor of 35 by increasing the compressive residual stress in the coating.

Keywords

coating-WC-Co fatigue HVOF residual stress substrate-6061Al 

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Copyright information

© ASM International 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. T. R. McGrann
    • 1
  • D. J. Greving
    • 1
  • J. R. Shadley
    • 1
  • E. F. Rybicki
    • 1
  • B. E. Bodger
    • 2
  • D. A. Somerville
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringThe University of TulsaTulsaUSA
  2. 2.Southwest Aeroservice, Inc.TulsaUSA

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