Advertisement

Journal of Thermal Spray Technology

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 208–213 | Cite as

Properties of aluminum deposited by a HVOF process

  • R. Chow
  • T. A. Decker
  • R. V. Gansert
  • D. Gansert
  • D. Lee
Reviewed Papers

Abstract

Pure aluminum coatings deposited by a high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) process have been produced and studied. A simple design-of-experiment (DOE) was used to assess the effect of two deposition parameters, the spray distance and oxygen-to-fuel ratio, on relevant coating properties. Porosity, surface roughness, and micro-hardness of the coatings were measured as responses to changes in the DOE parameters. The results indicated that these three properties of the aluminum coatings were normally insensitive to spray distance. Oxygen-to-fuel ratio, by flow, did appear to affect the porosity level of the coatings. Some post-coat processing of the aluminum coatings and minimization of nozzle loading are discussed.

Keywords

aluminum hardness HVOF porosity roughness 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    W.H. Thomason: “Cathodic Protection of Submerged Steel With Thermal-Sprayed Aluminum Coatings,” Materials Performance, 1984, 24(3), pp. 20–28.MathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    F. Génin, J. Menapace, A. Burnham, and I. Stowers: “Damage Thresholds of Painted and Coated Steel, and Other Metals at 1064nm (10-ns),” NIF-000-97-0004472, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 1998.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    M.J. Thomas: “Laser Damage Measurement of Flame Sprayed Aluminum Samples,” Report 011100LL, Spica Technologies, Nashua, NH, 2000.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. Pryatel, D. Ravizza, and I.F. Stowers: “Surface Cleanliness Validation by Swiping of NIF Components,” LLNL MEL98-012-OD (also NIF5002426), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 2001.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    R.L. Apps: “The Influence of Surface Preparation on the Bond Strength of Flame-Sprayed Aluminum Coatings on Mild Steel,” J. Vac. Sci. Technol., 1974, 11(4), pp. 741–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    H. Leidheiser, Jr., S. Music, A. Vértes, H. Herman, and R.A. Zatorski: “Metal/Flame-Sprayed-Aluminum Interface as Studied by Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy,” J. Electrochem. Soc., 1984, 131(6), pp. 1348–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    T.Z. Kattamis, M. Chen, R. Huie, J. Kelly, C. Fountzoulas, and M. Levy: “Microstructure, Adhesion, and Tribological Properties of Conventional Plasma-Sprayed Coatings on Steel Substrates,” J. Adhesion Sci. Technol., 1995, 9(7), pp. 907–21.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    R. Chow, T.A. Decker, R.V. Gansert, and D. Gansert: “Characterization of Thermal Sprayed Aluminum and Stainless Steel Coatings for Clean Laser Enclosers,” ASM Materials Solutions Conference and Exposition 2000, Thermal Spray, St. Louis, MO, 9–12 Oct 2000.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© ASM International 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Chow
    • 1
  • T. A. Decker
    • 1
  • R. V. Gansert
    • 2
  • D. Gansert
    • 2
  • D. Lee
    • 3
  1. 1.Lawrence Livermore National LaboratoryLivermore
  2. 2.Hardface Alloys, Inc.Sante Fe Springs
  3. 3.Stellite CoatingsGoshen

Personalised recommendations