Journal of Thermal Spray Technology

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 370–376 | Cite as

Effect of substrate temperature on adhesion strength of plasma-sprayed nickel coatings

  • V. Pershin
  • M. Lufitha
  • S. Chandra
  • J. Mostaghimi
Reviewed Papers

Abstract

We plasma-sprayed nickel coatings on stainless steel and cobalt alloy coupons heated to temperatures ranging from room temperature to 650 °C. Temperatures, velocities, and sizes of spray particles were recorded while in-flight and held constant during experiments. We measured coating adhesion strength and porosity, photographed coating microstructure, and determined thickness and composition of surface oxide layers on heated substrates. Coating adhesion strength on stainless steel coupons increased from 10–74 MPa when substrate temperatures were raised from 25–650 °C. Coating porosity was lower on high-temperature surfaces. Surface oxide layers grew thicker when substrates were heated, but oxidation alone could not account for the increase in coating adhesion strength. When a coupon was heated to 650 °C and allowed to cool before plasma-spraying, its coating adhesion strength was much less than that of a coating deposited on a surface maintained at 650 °C. Cobalt alloy coupons, which oxidize much less than stainless steel when heated, also showed improved coating adhesion when heated. Heating the substrate removes surface moisture and other volatile contaminants, delays solidification of droplets so that they can better penetrate surface cavities, and promotes diffusion between the coating and substrate. All of these mechanisms enhance coating adhesion.

Keywords

coating adhesion plasma spraying substrate temperature 

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Copyright information

© ASM International 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Pershin
    • 1
  • M. Lufitha
    • 1
  • S. Chandra
    • 1
  • J. Mostaghimi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical and Industrial EngineeringUniversity of Toronto, Centre for Advanced Coating TechnologiesTorontoCanada

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