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Journal of Thermal Spray Technology

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 354–359 | Cite as

Development of thermal spraying-sintering technology for solid oxide fuel cells

  • K. Okumura
  • Y. Aihara
  • S. Ito
  • S. Kawasaki
Article

Abstract

A thermal spraying-sintering process has been developed for an electrolyte and interconnect layer, which results in improved gas tightness, a thinner layer, and higher electric conductivity as required for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The process is characterized by the heat treatment of composition-controlled plasma-sprayed layers. For the electrolyte, the addition of MnO2 to zirconia powder is effective for reducing the sintering temperature to obtain gas tightness and for suppressing the reaction between zirconia and air electrode material. An electrolyte layer of 60 µm thickness with sufficient gas tightness and high ionic conductivity was obtained by this process. For the interconnect, chromium-rich lanthanum chromite powder, La0.8Ca0.2Cr1.10O3, is optimum for both gas tightness and high electric conductivity of the layer. In addition, a single cell with a 60 µm electrolyte was successfully fabricated using the thermal spraying-sintering process. As a result of an operating test using O2 and humidified H2 at 1000°C, a power density of 0.73 W/cm2 was obtained. It was demonstrated that the thermal spraying-sintering technology is effective for the fabrication of a thin gas tight layer for SOFCs.

Keywords

fuel cell gas tightness lanthanum chromite plasma spray sintering thermal spray zirconia 

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References

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Copyright information

© ASM International 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Okumura
    • 1
  • Y. Aihara
    • 1
  • S. Ito
    • 1
  • S. Kawasaki
    • 1
  1. 1.NGK Insulators, Ltd.NagoyaJapan

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