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A study of fusion zone microstructures of arc-welded joints made from dissimilar aluminum alloys

  • C. C. Menzemer
  • P. C. Lam
  • C. F. Wittel
  • T. S. Srivatsan
Article

Abstract

Arc welding has proven itself to be an economically affordable and efficient method for the joining of a wide variety of aluminum alloy structures that find extensive use in the industries of ground transportation and building construction. Welded joints, having a “T” configuration, in dissimilar aluminum alloys were produced using the semiautomatic arc welding process. In this study, a combination of a non-heat-treatable aluminum-magnesium alloy and a heat-treatable aluminum-magnesium-silicon alloy was successfully welded. Optical microscopy was used to characterize the fusion zone microstructures of the fillet-welded T joints. The intrinsic microstructural features and the development and presence of defects are highlighted.

Keywords

alloy 5083-H321 alloy 6061-T6 gas metal arc welding (GMAW) microstructures weld fusion zone 

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Copyright information

© ASM International 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. C. Menzemer
    • 1
  • P. C. Lam
    • 2
  • C. F. Wittel
    • 2
  • T. S. Srivatsan
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Civil Engineering, College of EngineeringThe University of AkronAkron
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of EngineeringThe University of AkronAkron

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