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Laser surface hardening of austenitic stainless steel

  • S. M. Levcovici
  • D. T. Levcovici
  • V. Munteanu
  • M. M. Paraschiv
  • A. Preda
Article

Abstract

For the purpose of studying the possibilities of increasing the wear resistance, keeping a high level of corrosion strength, austenitic stainless steel specimens mainly containing 19.2%Cr and 9.4%Ni were two-step surface alloyed using added materials (AMs) with hard particles of carbides (WC), nitrides (TiN), and borides (TiB2). The simultaneous melting of AM and surface layer was performed by a CO2 continuous wave laser on a numerically controlled X-Y table. On these specimens, the microstructural characteristics, microhardness, and depth of the molten zone were determined, which allowed definition of the AM with the best hardening effect. The research continued by two-step laser surface alloying of the same base material with different effective AM quantities. The specimens were processed by continuous wave laser radiation, by multiple-pass with 35% overlap. The alloyed layers were described by light optical microscopy, x-ray diffractometry, flash spectrometry, and hardness measurement. The conditions to obtain compact surface layers with 2.5 to 3 times higher hardness than the base material were determined.

Keywords

austenite stainless steel borides carbides laser hardening nitrides surface modification 

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Copyright information

© ASM International 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. M. Levcovici
    • 1
  • D. T. Levcovici
    • 2
  • V. Munteanu
    • 2
  • M. M. Paraschiv
    • 2
  • A. Preda
    • 2
  1. 1.“DunĂrea de Jos” UniversityGalatziRomania
  2. 2.The Research and Design Institute“Uzinsider Engineering” S.A.GalatziRomania

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