Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention

, Volume 5, Issue 6, pp 7–12 | Cite as

Material failure modes, part II: A brief tutorial on impact, spalling, wear, brinelling, thermal shock, and radiation damage

  • Benjamin D. Craig
Features Tutorial

Conclusion

A number of material failure modes were introduced in this article, including impact, spalling, wear, brinelling, thermal shock, and radiation damage. These mechanisms can affect metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites in various applications and in many different environments. Thus, it is important to take these failure modes into consideration during the design phases of a component or system in order to make appropriate materials selection decisions.

Part Three of this article will contain the final installment of failure modes. These will include uniform, galvanic, crevice, pitting, intergranular, and erosion corrosion; selective leaching/dealloying; hydrogen damage; stress-corrosion cracking; and corrosion fatigue.

Keywords

Failure Mode Wear Rate Thermal Shock Abrasive Wear Adhesive Wear 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ASM International 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin D. Craig
    • 1
  1. 1.Advanced Materials and Processes Technology Information Analysis Center (AMPTIAC)Rome

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