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Biomechanical properties of soft tissues

  • Yanjun Zeng
  • Chuanqing Xu
  • Jian Yang
  • Xiaohu Xu
Article
  • 113 Downloads

Abstract

Viscoelasticity is the primary mechanical property of bio-soft tissues. It has been widely applied in basic research of biological tissues including cornea, lung, heart and blood vessels. Along with the development of tissue engineering research, the evaluation of soft tissue viscoelasticity is becoming more and more important. In this paper, using the Whittaker function, we give an approximate power series of the exponential integralE 1(X) and the parametersC, ⦦1 and ⦦2 of the generalized relaxation functionG(t) and generalized creep functionJ(t). With expanded skin as an example, the relationship between stress relaxation, creep and stress-strain finite deformation are studied.

Keywords

bio-soft tissue viscoelasiticity creep stress relaxation stress-strain relationship 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yanjun Zeng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chuanqing Xu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jian Yang
    • 2
  • Xiaohu Xu
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical SchoolShantou UniversityShantouChina
  2. 2.Biomedical Engineering CenterBeijing Polytechnic UniversityBeijingChina

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