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Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences

, Volume 48, Issue 5, pp 662–675 | Cite as

Early-Mid Ordovician brachiopod diversification in South China

  • Renbin Zhan
  • Jiayu Rong
  • Jinhui Cheng
  • Pengfei Chen
Article

Abstract

Affected by paleogeographic position, paleoclimatic condition and depositional environments, the increase of the Early-Mid Ordovician brachiopod diversity of South China commenced at the beginning of the Ordovician (early Tremadoc), accelerated from the Tetragraptus approximatus Biozone (base of Arenig), and reached its first acme in the Didymograptus eobifidus Biozone (mid early Arenig) when the number of brachiopod genera was over 7 times as great as that at the start of the Ordovician. This was the first radiation in the history of brachiopod macroevolution in South China, which occurred nearly 5 graptolitic biozones earlier than the global trend of the great Ordovician biodiversification (in the lower part of the Undulograptus austrodentatus Biozone). It is also characterized by (1) the origination or first occurrences of some major groups, such as the punctate dalmanelloids and the pseudopunctate strophomenoids including Plectambonitoidea (cardinal process simple or absent) and Strophomenoidea (cardinal process bilobed) in South China; (2) niche expansion, particularly in the first occupation of deeper water benthic regimes by the Euorthisina-Nocturnellia Association developed at Houping, Chengkou, northern Chongqing; and (3) the differentiation of brachiopod faunas under different environmental conditions. The gradual and increasing separation from Gondwana may have been one of the factors responsible for the radiation in South China.

Keywords

biodiversity evolutionary radiation brachiopods Early-Mid Ordovician South China 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Renbin Zhan
    • 1
  • Jiayu Rong
    • 1
  • Jinhui Cheng
    • 1
  • Pengfei Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Nanjing Institute of Geology and PalaeontologyChinese Academy of Sciences; State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and StratigraphyNanjingChina

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