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Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences

, Volume 47, Issue 7, pp 618–629 | Cite as

Criteria for defining and recognizing the various orders of sequences in outcrop sequence stratigraphy

Article

Abstract

The regional distribution in different depositional facies belts is here regarded as an important criterion for defining and recognizing the various orders of sequences. The third-order sequence is possibly global in nature, which may be discerned in different depositional facies belts in one continental margin and can be correlated over long distances, sometimes even worldwide. Commonly, correlation of subsequence (fourth-order sequence with time interval of 0.5–1.5 Ma) is difficult in different facies belts, although some of them may also be worldwide in distribution. A subsequence should be able to discern and correlate within at least one facies belt. The higher-order sequences, including microsequence (fifth-order sequence) and minisequence (sixth-order sequence), are regional or local in distribution. They may reflect the longer and shorter Milankovitch cycles respectively. Sequence and subsequence are usually recognizable in different facies belts, while microsequence and minisequence may be distinguished only in shallow marine deposits, but not in slope and basin facies deposits. A brief discussion is made on the essential conditions for correct identification of sequences, useful methods of study, and problems meriting special attention in outcrop sequence stratigraphy.

Keywords

outcrop sequence stratigraphy facies belt sequence subsequence microsequence minisequence meter-scale cyclothem Milankovitch cycle 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Earth Sciences and Mineral ResourcesChina University of GeosciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and StratigraphyNanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of SciencesNanjingChina

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