The role of atomic hydrogen and hydrogen-induced martensites in hydrogen embrittlement of type 304L stainless steel

  • Chuan Pan
  • Chu Wuyan
  • Li Zhengbang
  • Liang Dongtu
  • Su Yanjing
  • Qiao Lijie
Article
  • 69 Downloads

Abstract

The role of atomic hydrogen and hydrogen-induced martensites in hydrogen embrittlement in slow strain rate tensile tests and hydrogen-induced delayed cracking (HIC) in sustained load tests for type 304 L stainless steel was quantitatively studied. The results indicated that hydrogen-induced martensites formed when hydrogen concentration C 0 exceeded 30 ppm, and increased with an increase in C 0, i.e. M(vol%)=62–82.5 exp (−C 0/102). The relative plasticity loss caused by the martensites increased linearly with increasing amount of the martensites, i.e. l δ(M), %=0.45 M (vol %)=27.9−37.1 exp(−C0/102). The plasticity loss caused by atomic hydrogen l δ(H) increased with an increase in C 0 and reached a saturation value l δ(H)max=40% when C 0>100 ppm. l δ(H) decreased with an increase in strain rate \(\dot \varepsilon \), i.e. l δ(H), \(\% = - 21.9 - 9.9\dot \varepsilon \), and was zero when \(\dot \varepsilon \geqslant \dot \varepsilon _c = 0.032/s\). HIC under sustained load was due to atomic hydrogen, and the threshold stress intensity for HIC decreased linearly with in C 0, i.e. K IH (Mpam1/2)=91.7−10.1 In C 0 (ppm). The fracture surface of HIC was dimple if K 1 was high or/and C 0 was low, otherwise it was quasi-cleavage. The boundary line between ductile and brittle fracture surface was K 1-54+25exp(−C 0/153)=0.

Keywords

type 304 L stainless steel hydrogen embrittlement hydrogen-induced cracking hydrogen-induced martensites 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chuan Pan
    • 1
  • Chu Wuyan
    • 1
  • Li Zhengbang
    • 1
  • Liang Dongtu
    • 1
  • Su Yanjing
    • 2
  • Qiao Lijie
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Welding Research CentralIron and steel Research Institute BeijingBeijingChina
  2. 2.Department of Materials PhysicsUniversity of Science and Technology BeijingBeijingChina

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