Advertisement

Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences

, Volume 45, Issue 3, pp 241–249 | Cite as

Microgastropod records in paleoceanographical environment of southern shelf of South China Sea since 14 ka

Article
  • 27 Downloads

Abstract

Very diversified and abundant benthic microgastropods and planktonic microgastropods (pteropods) from core NS93-12-25 could provide a glance of change of the sea level in the south continental shelf of the South China Sea since last 14 ka. Research shows that general sea level changes of this sea area were rising and later rising after a short period of falling in this period. In the range from the bottom of the core to the core depth of 200 cm, individuals in big size are common in microgastropods and Turritella filiola is very rich, signifying the environment of the inner continental shelf in the last deglaciation stage. In the core depth range of 200–150 cm the continuously getting light of the δ18O, the regularly decreasing of the percentage content of T. filiola and the high diversification of microgastropods indicate the rising of the sea level. Especially at the core depth range of 175–150 cm the pteropods became dominant, making sure the fact that the high sea level possibly occurred in the early Holocene. Channels of surrounding straits connecting the adjacent sea thus were opened. But at the core depth of about 100 cm T. filiola became very rich again. This possibly implies that there was a short term of the sea level falling, resulting in the temporal closure of the channels. In the core depth range of 55–50 cm the Scaliola’s representatives relatively develop and this may be inferred to the cooling of climate.

Keywords

southern shelf of South China Sea microgastropod paleoceanographical environment 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Scott, D. B., Mudie, P. J., Vilks, G. et al., Latest Pleistocene-Holocene paleoceanographic trends on the continental margin of Eastern Canada: Foraminiferal, dinoflagellate and pollen evidence, Mar. Micropaleontol., 1984, 9(3): 181–218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Min Qiubao, Zhao Quanhong, Wang Pinxian et al., Paleoceanography of the outer shelf, northern South China Sea: A preliminary study, in Contributions to Late Quaternary Paleoceanography of the South China Sea (eds. Ye Zhizheng, Wang Pinxian ) (in Chinese), Qingdao: Qingdao Ocean University Press, 1992, 108–118.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Gao Liang, Yan Jun, Xue Shengji, Late Quaternary paleoceanography in the northwest shelf of the South China Sea, in Contributions to Late Quaternary Paleoceanography of the South China Sea (eds. Ye Zhizheng, Wang Pinxian) (in Chinese), Qingdao: Qingdao Ocean University Press, 1992, 96–107.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Feng Weimin, Distribution of the microgastropods in the surface sediments of the southern continental shelf, South China Sea, and its relationship to environmental factors, in Marine Fauna and Flora and Biogeography of the Nansha Islands and Neighbouring Waters ( I ) (in Chinese), Beijing: Ocean Press, 1994, 27–41.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Chen Muhong, Cai Huimei, Lu Linhuang et al., Late Quaternary microbiotas and environment of the Nansha Islands and adjacent sea, Chinese Science Bulletin, 1997,42(11): 1121–1128.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Huang Qizhou, Yue Zhang, Temperature and salty destribution and water masses of the Nansha Islands in summer of year 1988, in Marine Environmental Studies of the Nansha Islands and Adjacent Sea Area: Transactions (I) (in Chinese), Wuhan: Science and Technique Press of Hubei Province, 1991, 18–30.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Takashi Okutani, Marine Mollusks in Japan, Tokai: Tokai University Press, 2000, 1–1224.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Feng Weimin, Lan Xiu, Wang Jinquan, Microgastropod and microbivalvia distribution in surface sediments of the Xisha and Zhongsha islands, South China Sea, Tropic Oceanology (in Chinese), 1997, 16(4): 1–10.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Feng Weimin, Microgastropods from the Nansha sea area, China, in Studies on Marine Fauna and Flora and Biogeography of the Nansha Islands and Neighboring Waters (II) (in Chinese), Beijing: Ocean Press, 1996, 85–205.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ling Guangyu, Study on Genus Ringiculla (Opsthobranchia) of China sea area, in Transactions of the Chinese Sciety of Malacology (I) (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 1983, 23–30.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Zheng Zhizhong, Tu Xia, Cai Huimei et al., Sedimental organisms, in Multidisciplinary Investigation of the Nansha Islands and Its Adjacent Sea Area ( I ), Vol. 2 (ed. by The Multidisciplinary Oceanographic Expedition Team of Academia Sinica to the Nansha Islands) (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 1989, 774–801.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Su Guangqing, Chen Shaomou, Study on sedimental environment of the Nansha Islands sea area, in Marine Environmental Studies of the Nansha Islands and Adjacent Sea Area: Transactions (in Chinese) (I), Wuhan: Sci-Tech Press of Hubei Province, 1991, 308–315.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Wang Pinxian, South China Sea Since 150 ka (in Chinese), Shanghai: Tongji University Press, 1995, 1–184.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Li Baohua, Jian Zhimin, Wang Pinxian, Pulleniantina obliquiloculata as a paleoceanographic indicator in the southern Okinawa Trough during the last 20000 years, Marine Micropaleontology, 1997, 32(1,2): 59–69.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Wang Jiliang, The change of thermocline depth in the northern Okinawa Trough during the Holocene, Quaternary Sciences (in Chinese), 1998, (3): 281.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nanjing Institute of Geology and PalaeontologyChinese Academy of SciencesNanjingChina

Personalised recommendations