Chinese Science Bulletin

, Volume 47, Issue 3, pp 211–213 | Cite as

Clonogenic colony-forming ability of hepatic stem cells in the spleens of mice

  • Juan Su
  • Yucheng Yao
  • Hongyu Yu
  • Haiying Zhu
  • Xinmin Wang
  • Zhonghua Wang
  • Yiping Hu
Notes
  • 22 Downloads

Abstract

To confirm the existence of hepatic stem cells (HSCs), fetal liver cells isolated from mice on embryonic day 13 (ED13) were long-term cultured in vitro. Growth of the cells was observed intensively and characteristics were identified by immunocytochemistry. The results showed that some of the cells grew as colonies, in which some cells expressed AFP, CD34 and Albumin. Then the cells were transplanted intravenously into irradiated syngeneic mice. At day 12 a number of small hyperplasia nodules were seen in the apparently enlarged spleens of recipient mice. Moreover, some nodules were positive for AFP and CD34 and consisted of various types of cells, suggesting the very existence of hepatic stem cells in the mouse fetal liver.

Keywords

hepatic stem cells fetal liver cells in vivo transplantation colony-forming-units clonal growth hepatogenous splenic hyperplasia nodules 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Kinosita, R., Studies on the carcinogenic chemical substances, Trans. Soc. Pathol. Jpn., 1937, 27: 665.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Wilson, J. W., Leduc, E. H., Role of cholangioles in restoration of the liver of the mouse after dietary injury, J. Pathol. Bacterial., 1958, 76: 441.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Su, J., Yao, Y. C., Hu, Y. P. et al., Isolation and identification of hepatic stem-like cells, Carcinogenesis, Teratogenesis and Mutagenesis, 2000, 12(4): 200.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Watt, F. M., Hogan, B. L. M., Out of Eden: Stem cells and their niches, Science, 2000, 287(5457): 1427.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Gage, F. H., Mammalian neural stem cells, Science, 2000, 287(5457): 1433.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Bordignon, C., Carlo Stella, C., Colombo, M. P. et al., Cell therapy: Achievements and perspective, Haematologica, 1999, 84(12): 1110.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ohgushi, H., Caplan, A. I., Stem cell technology and bioceramics: from cell to gene engineering, J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 1999, 48(6): 913.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Ruck, P., Xiao, J. C., Pietsch, T. et al., Hepatic stem-like cells in hepatoblastoma: expression of cytokeratin 7, albumin and oval cell associated antigens detected by OV-1 and OV-6, Histopathology, 1997, 31: 324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Fiorino, A. S., Diehl, A. M., Lin, H. Z. et al., Maturation-dependent gene expression in a conditionally transformed liver progenitor cell line, In vitro Cell Dev. Biol-Animal., 1998, 34: 247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Wang, Z. H., Su, J., Hu, Y. P., Molecular mechanism in liver regeneration, Zi Ran Za Zhi (in Chinese), 2000, 22(4): 199.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Bhatia, S. N., Balis, U. J., Yarmush, M. L. et al., Effect of cell-cell interactions in preservation of cellular phenotype: cocultivation of hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells, FASEB J., 1999, 13: 1883.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Thorgeirsson, S. S., Hepatic stem cells in liver regeneration, FASEB J., 1996, 10: 1249.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    McCulloch, E. A., Siminovitch, L., Till, J. E. et al., The cellular basis of genetically determined hemopoictec defect in anemic mice of genotype S1/S111, Blood, 1964, 26: 399.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juan Su
    • 1
  • Yucheng Yao
    • 1
  • Hongyu Yu
    • 2
  • Haiying Zhu
    • 1
  • Xinmin Wang
    • 1
  • Zhonghua Wang
    • 1
  • Yiping Hu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cell BiologyThe Second Military Medical UniversityShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Department of PathologyThe Second Military Medical UniversityShanghaiChina

Personalised recommendations