Human umbilical cord blood serum promotes growth, proliferation, as well as differentiation of human bone marrow-derived progenitor cells

  • Smruti M. Phadnis
  • Mugha V. Joglekar
  • Vijayalakshmi Venkateshan
  • Surendra M. Ghaskadbi
  • Anandwardhan A. Hardikar
  • Ramesh R. Bhonde
Article
  • 122 Downloads

Summary

Felal calf serum (FCS) is conventionally used for animal cell cultures due to its inherent growth-promoting activities. However animal welfare issues and stringent requirements for human transplantation studies demand a suitable alternative for FCS. With this view, we studied the effect of FCS, human AB serum (ABS), and human umbilical cord blood serum (UCBS) on murine islets of Langerhans and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal-like cells (hBMCs). We found that there was no difference in morphology and functionality of mouse islets cultured in any of these three different serum supplements as indicated by insulin immunostaining. A comparative analysis of hBMCs maintained in each of these three different serum supplements demonstrated that UCBS supplemented media better supported proliferation of hBMCs. Moreover, a modification of adipogenic differentiation protocol using UCBS indicates that it can be used as a supplement to support differentiation of hBMCs into adipocytes. Our results demonstrate that UCBS not only is suitable for maintenance of murine pancreatic islets, but also supports attachment, propagation, and differentiation of hBMCs in vitro. We conclude that UCBS can serve as a better serum supplement for growth, maintenance, and differentiation of hBMCs, making it a more suitable supplement in cell systems that have therapeutic potential in human transplantation programs.

Key words

umbilical cord blood serum fetal calf serum islets bone marrow serum supplement 

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Copyright information

© Society for In Vitro Biology 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Smruti M. Phadnis
    • 1
  • Mugha V. Joglekar
    • 2
  • Vijayalakshmi Venkateshan
    • 4
  • Surendra M. Ghaskadbi
    • 1
  • Anandwardhan A. Hardikar
    • 3
  • Ramesh R. Bhonde
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Animal SciencesAgharkar Research InstitutePuneIndia
  2. 2.Tissue Engineering and Banking LaboratoryNational Genter for Cell SciencePuneIndia
  3. 3.Stem Cell and Diabetes SectionNational Center for Cell SciencePuneIndia
  4. 4.Department of BiochemistryNational Institute of NutritionHyderabadIndia

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