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Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 22, Supplement 3, pp 1365–1370 | Cite as

Bis Expression in Patients with Surgically Resected Lung Cancer and its Clinical Significance

  • Chang Dong Yeo
  • Gyeong Sin Park
  • Nahyeon Kang
  • Su Yeon Choi
  • Hye Yun Kim
  • Dong Soo Lee
  • Yeon Sil Kim
  • Young Kyoon Kim
  • Jae Gil Park
  • Sook Whan Sung
  • Kyo Young Lee
  • Mi Sun Park
  • Hyeon Woo Yim
  • Seung Joon Kim
  • Jeong-Hwa Lee
Thoracic Oncology

Abstract

Background

Bis, also known as BAG3, has been identified as a Bcl-2-interacting protein that enhances cellular anti-apoptotic activity. It is involved in cellular differentiation, angiogenesis, migration, and invasion in various tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the Bis expression pattern, and the clinical significance thereof, in patients with resected lung cancer.

Methods

We studied 121 lung cancer patients who underwent curative surgical resection. Patient clinicopathological characteristics were reviewed retrospectively from medical records, including tumor recurrence and survival. The expression of Bis protein in lung cancer tissues was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining and was assessed using a four-tiered intensity score system (negative, weak, moderate, strong). Enhanced Bis expression at the periphery of a tumor facing the adjacent nontumor region was referred as “marginal activity.”

Results

Although Bis expression was higher in squamous cell carcinoma than in adenocarcinoma, marginal activity was higher in adenocarcinoma than in squamous cell carcinoma. All of the small cell carcinomas and lung cancer with neuroendocrine differentiation examined were negative for Bis expression. Compared with stage I lung cancer, patients with stage II and IIIA lung cancer exhibited higher Bis protein levels in lung tissues. Recurrence and survival rates did not differ significantly according to Bis expression intensity score or marginal activity.

Conclusions

Our study demonstrated that Bis expression differed according to the histological type and pathological stage of the lung cancer. Further studies are needed to assess its use as a biomarker and its role in the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer.

Keywords

Lung Cancer Squamous Cell Carcinoma Lung Cancer Patient Small Cell Carcinoma Large Cell Carcinoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grants, funded by the Korean Government (MSIP) (Nos. 2014R1A2A1A11052422, 2012R1A1A2007589 and 2012R1A5A2047939).

Disclosures

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chang Dong Yeo
    • 1
  • Gyeong Sin Park
    • 2
    • 3
  • Nahyeon Kang
    • 1
    • 3
  • Su Yeon Choi
    • 1
    • 3
  • Hye Yun Kim
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Dong Soo Lee
    • 6
  • Yeon Sil Kim
    • 6
  • Young Kyoon Kim
    • 1
  • Jae Gil Park
    • 7
  • Sook Whan Sung
    • 7
  • Kyo Young Lee
    • 2
  • Mi Sun Park
    • 8
    • 9
  • Hyeon Woo Yim
    • 8
    • 9
  • Seung Joon Kim
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jeong-Hwa Lee
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Hospital PathologyThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.The Cancer Research InstituteThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Department of Biochemistry, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.Cancer Evolution Research CenterThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  6. 6.Department of Radiation OncologyThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  7. 7.Department of Thoracic SurgeryThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  8. 8.Department of BiostatisticsThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  9. 9.Clinical Research Coordinating CenterThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea

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