Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 17, Issue 12, pp 3259–3268 | Cite as

The Clinical Outcome of Chemotherapy-Induced Amenorrhea in Premenopausal Young Patients with Breast Cancer with Long-Term Follow-up

  • Minkyu Jung
  • Hyun Joon Shin
  • Sun Young Rha
  • Hei Cheul Jeung
  • Soojung Hong
  • Yong Wha Moon
  • Hyo Song Kim
  • Kyung Jin Oh
  • Woo Ick Yang
  • Jae Kyung Roh
  • Hyun Cheol Chung
Breast Oncology

Abstract

Background

We investigated the factors that predict chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea (CIA) and the prognostic significance of CIA after long-term follow-up.

Methods

We reviewed data from 241 premenopausal patients with breast cancer who underwent adjuvant CMF or FAC chemotherapy after breast cancer surgery between January 1995 and December 2000.

Results

The median follow-up duration was 109.8 (range, 16.6–193.1) months. The age of CIA patients was older than non-CIA patients (median, 44 (range, 28–53) years and 36 (range, 25–49) years, respectively; P < 0.001). The addition of tamoxifen to the chemotherapy increased the incidence of CIA from 48% to 63.6% (P = 0.015). The 10-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was higher in the CIA group compared with the non-CIA group in hormonal receptor-positive patients (78.4% vs. 67%, respectively; P = 0.022), and the 10-year overall survival (OS) rate also was higher in the CIA group compared with the non-CIA group (90.8% vs. 79.7%, respectively; P = 0.041).

Conclusions

The most important predictors of CIA are age and the addition of tamoxifen to the chemotherapy. CIA is likely to have an influence on DFS and OS in premenopausal patients with breast cancer with a positive hormone receptor, and it might be used as a surrogate marker for effective chemotherapy in these young Asian patients.

Keywords

Breast Cancer Overall Survival Tamoxifen Amenorrhea EXemestane 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This work was supported by the Korea Science and Engineering Fund (KOSEF) grant funded by the Korea government (MOST) (R11-2000-082-03002-0).

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Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Minkyu Jung
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • Hyun Joon Shin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sun Young Rha
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  • Hei Cheul Jeung
    • 1
    • 2
  • Soojung Hong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yong Wha Moon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hyo Song Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kyung Jin Oh
    • 1
  • Woo Ick Yang
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jae Kyung Roh
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  • Hyun Cheol Chung
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  1. 1.Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal MedicineYonsei University College of MedicineSeoulKorea
  2. 2.Yonsei Cancer CenterYonsei University College of MedicineSeoulKorea
  3. 3.BK21 Project for Medical ScienceYonsei University College of MedicineSeoulKorea
  4. 4.Department of PathologyYonsei University College of MedicineSeoulKorea
  5. 5.Cancer Metastasis Research Center, Yonsei Cancer CenterYonsei University College of MedicineSeoulKorea

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