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Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 16, Issue 6, pp 1612–1618 | Cite as

Local Control, Toxicity, and Cosmesis in Women Younger Than 50 Enrolled Onto the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Radiation Therapy System Registry Trial

  • A. J. Khan
  • F. Vicini
  • P. Beitsch
  • B. Haffty
  • C. Quiet
  • A. Keleher
  • D. Garcia
  • H. Snider
  • M. Gittleman
  • V. Zannis
  • H. Kuerer
  • E. Whitacre
  • P. WhitworthJr
  • R. Fine
Breast Oncology

Background

The American Society of Breast Surgeons enrolled women onto a registry trial to prospectively study patients treated with the MammoSite Radiation Therapy System (RTS) breast brachytherapy device. This report examines local recurrence (LR), toxicity, and cosmesis as a function of age in women enrolled onto the trial.

Methods

A total of 1449 primary early-stage breast cancers were treated in 1440 women. Of these, 130 occurred in women younger than 50 years of age. Fisher’s exact test was performed to correlate age (<50 vs. ≥ 50 years) with toxicity and with cosmesis. The association of age with LR failure times was investigated by fitting a parametric model.

Results

Women younger than 50 were more likely to develop fat necrosis: 4.6% (6 of 130) vs. 1.8% (24 of 1319) (P = .0456). Other toxicities were comparable. At 2 years, cosmesis was excellent or good in 87% of assessable women aged <50 years (n = 74) and in 94% of assessable older women (n = 751) (P = .0197). At 3 years, this difference disappeared: excellent or good in 90% (56 of 62) of younger women vs. 93% (573 of 614) of older women (P = .2902). The crude LR rate for the group was 1.7% (25 of 1449). There was no statistically significant difference in LR as a function of age. In women <50, 3.1% (4 of 130) developed a LR; in the older patients, 1.6% (21 of 1319) developed LR (3-year actuarial LR rates, 2.9% vs. 1.7%, respectively; P = .2284).

Conclusions

Accelerated partial breast irradiation with the MammoSite RTS results in low toxicity and produces similar cosmesis and local control at 3 years in women younger than 50 when compared with older women.

Keywords

Local Recurrence Accelerate Partial Breast Irradiation Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence Actuarial Local Control Rate Actuarial Local Recurrence Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

The MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial is supported in part by an unrestricted educational grant from Hologic Inc. to the American Society of Breast Surgeons and BioStat International Inc. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Khan
    • 1
  • F. Vicini
    • 2
  • P. Beitsch
    • 2
  • B. Haffty
    • 2
  • C. Quiet
    • 2
  • A. Keleher
    • 2
  • D. Garcia
    • 2
  • H. Snider
    • 2
  • M. Gittleman
    • 2
  • V. Zannis
    • 2
  • H. Kuerer
    • 2
  • E. Whitacre
    • 2
  • P. WhitworthJr
    • 2
  • R. Fine
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Radiation OncologyRobert Wood Johnson University Hospital/Cancer Institute of New JerseyNew BrunswickUSA
  2. 2.American Society of Breast SurgeonsColumbiaUSA

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