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Predicting the Value of Adjuvant Therapy in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma by Combining the Total Number of Examined Lymph Nodes with the Positive Lymph Node Ratio

  • Yida Li
  • Weixin Zhao
  • Jianjiao Ni
  • Liqing Zou
  • Xi Yang
  • Weiwei Yu
  • Xiaolong Fu
  • Kuaile Zhao
  • Yawei Zhang
  • Haiquan Chen
  • Jiaqing Xiang
  • Congying Xie
  • Zhengfei ZhuEmail author
Thoracic Oncology

Abstract

Background

The value of adjuvant therapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has been controversial, at least partially due to the lack of efficient criteria for selecting suitable patients. This study aimed to explore the existence of parameters related to lymph node (LN) status that can predict the value of adjuvant therapy in ESCC.

Methods

The study included 298 patients with ESCC who had undergone radical esophagectomy with lymphadenectomy. Adjuvant therapy was defined as reception of adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy. For the study, LN ratio (LNR), total number of resected LNs (TLNs), and pN stage were selected for Cox regression analyses, including their correlations and prognostic values for survival. Log-rank tests were used to compare the survival rates of the patients with and without adjuvant therapy stratified by pN stage, TLNs, LNR, or their combinations.

Results

The independent prognostic factors for survival were TLNs, LNR, and pN stage. Whereas pN stage was significantly related to TLNs and LNR, TLNs were not correlated with LNR. The survival rates between the patients with and those without adjuvant therapy stratified by pN stage, TLNs, or LNR did not differ significantly. We used the median values of TLNs and LNR to group the patients into four groups. The patients in the group with fewer TLNs and higher LNR who had undergone adjuvant therapy showed a significantly better survival than those without adjuvant therapy (p = 0.030).

Conclusions

In contrast to TLNs, LNR, and pN stage as single factors, the combination of TLNs and LNR can predict the value of adjuvant therapy.

Notes

Acknowledgment

This work was sponsored by the National Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 81872461); the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry; and the Foundation of Shanghai Municipal Commission of Health and Family Planning (Grant No. 01540211).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Disclosures

All authors have read and approved the manuscript. We have no financial disclosures. We are not using any copyrighted information, patient photographs, identifiers, or other protected health information in this paper. No text, text boxes, figures, or tables in this article have been previously published or are owned by another party.

Supplementary material

10434_2019_7489_MOESM1_ESM.docx (387 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 387 kb)

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Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yida Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Weixin Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jianjiao Ni
    • 1
    • 2
  • Liqing Zou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xi Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Weiwei Yu
    • 3
  • Xiaolong Fu
    • 4
  • Kuaile Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yawei Zhang
    • 2
    • 5
  • Haiquan Chen
    • 2
    • 5
  • Jiaqing Xiang
    • 2
    • 5
  • Congying Xie
    • 6
  • Zhengfei Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Radiation OncologyFudan University Shanghai Cancer CenterShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical CollegeFudan UniversityShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Department of Radiation OncologySix Hospital of Jiao Tong UniversityShanghaiChina
  4. 4.Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Chest HospitalShanghai Jiao Tong UniversityShanghaiChina
  5. 5.Department of Thoracic SurgeryFudan University Shanghai Cancer CenterShanghaiChina
  6. 6.Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy DepartmentThe First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical UniversityWenzhouChina

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