The AAPS Journal

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp E461–E465 | Cite as

Targeted lipidomics: Discovery of new fatty acyl amides

  • Bo Tan
  • Heather B. Bradshaw
  • Neta Rimmerman
  • Harini Srinivasan
  • Y. William Yu
  • Jocelyn F. Krey
  • M. Francesca Monn
  • Jay Shih-Chieh Chen
  • Sherry Shu-Jung Hu
  • Sarah R. Pickens
  • J. Michael Walker
Article

Abstract

The discovery of endogenous fatty acyl amides such asN-arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide),N-oleoyl ethanolamide (OEA), andN-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) as important signaling molecules in the central and peripheral nervous system has led us to pursue other unidentified signaling molecules. Until recently, technical challenges, particularly those associated with lipid purification and chemical analysis, have hindered the identification of low abundance signaling lipids. Improvements in chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) such as miniaturization of high-performance liquid chromatography components, hybridization of multistage mass spectrometers and time-of-flight technology, the development of electrospray ionization (ESI) and of information-dependent acquisition, now permit rapid identification of novel, low abundance, signaling lipids.

Keywords

lipidomics cannabinoid fatty acyl amide information-dependent acquisition HPLC-MS/MS nano-HPLC 

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Copyright information

© American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bo Tan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Heather B. Bradshaw
    • 1
    • 2
  • Neta Rimmerman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Harini Srinivasan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Y. William Yu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jocelyn F. Krey
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Francesca Monn
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jay Shih-Chieh Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sherry Shu-Jung Hu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sarah R. Pickens
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Michael Walker
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Gill Center for Biomolecular ScienceIndiana UniversityBloomington
  2. 2.Department of Psychological and Brain ScienceIndiana UniversitySt. Bloomington

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