Predictors of neurocognitive performance in chronic pain patients

  • Tony Iezzi
  • Melanie P. Duckworth
  • Lieu N. Vuong
  • Yvonne M. Archibald
  • Ann Klinck
Article

Abstract

In a sample of 70 chronic pain patients, hierarchical multiple regression analyses were utilized to assess the additive and interactive contributions of pain severity and psychological distress variables to neurocognitive performance across attention and concentration, memory, and reasoning ability domains. Although the full model predicting attention and concentration was found to be significant, there was no significant contribution of pain severity, psychological distress, or the Pain Severity x Psychological Distress interaction to the prediction of attention and concentration scores after controlling for the effect of years of formal education. After controlling for the effect of years of formal education, pain severity and psychological distress did make separate and significant contributions to the prediction of memory scores; however, the Pain Severity x Psychological Distress interaction did not significantly affect memory scores. After controlling for the effect of years of formal education, there was no significant contribution of pain severity, psychological distress, or the Pain Severity x Psychological Distress interaction to reasoning ability scores. Results suggest the importance of assessing memory function when managing psychologically distressed chronic pain patients.

Key words

chronic pain psychological distress neurocognitive performance 

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Copyright information

© International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tony Iezzi
    • 1
  • Melanie P. Duckworth
    • 2
  • Lieu N. Vuong
    • 3
  • Yvonne M. Archibald
    • 1
  • Ann Klinck
    • 1
  1. 1.Behavioral Medicine ServiceLondon Health Sciences CentreLondon, OntarioCanada
  2. 2.Department of Psychology/MS298University of Nevada-RenoUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of HoustonHouston, TexasUSA

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