International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 364–377 | Cite as

Cognitive coping skills training in children with sickle cell disease pain

  • Karen M. Gil
  • Jennifer J. Wilson
  • Jennifer L. Edens
  • Elizabeth Workman
  • Jawana Ready
  • Jan Sedway
  • Rupa Redding-Lallinger
  • Charles W. Daeschner
Article

Abrstract

This study was designed to examine whether brief training in cognitive coping skills would enhance pain coping strategies and alter pain perception in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD). Forty-nine participants with SCD were randomly assigned to either a cognitive coping skills condition or a standard care control condition. At pre- and posttesting, coping strategies and pain sensitivity using laboratory pain stimulation were measured. Results indicated that, in comparison to the randomly assigned control condition, brief training in cognitive coping skills resulted in decreased negative thinking and lower pain ratings during low intensity laboratory pain stimulation.

Key words

sickle cell disease laboratory-induced pain coping skills training disease-related pain pediatric pain 

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Copyright information

© International Society of Behavioral Medicine 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen M. Gil
    • 1
  • Jennifer J. Wilson
    • 1
  • Jennifer L. Edens
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Workman
    • 1
  • Jawana Ready
    • 1
  • Jan Sedway
    • 1
  • Rupa Redding-Lallinger
    • 2
  • Charles W. Daeschner
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.University of North Carolina School of MedicineChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.East Carolina University School of MedicineGreenvilleUSA

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