BMC Microbiology

, 16:219 | Cite as

Erratum to: Genotyping bacterial and fungal pathogens using sequence variation in the gene for the CCA-adding enzyme

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Erratum
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Erratum:

Unfortunately, the original version of this article [1] contained an error, Fig. 3b was incorrectly labeled.

In regards to Fig. 3b, for the analysis of a possible impact of human DNA in the Vibrio-specific PCR amplification of loop-encoding DNA sequences, the individual lanes with admixture of 0, 50 or 100 ng of human DNA contained only DNA of one of the individual Vibrio strains. Hence, the labels 1, 2 and 3 (indicating different Vibrio strains) are erroneous.

A corrected version and legend for Fig. 3 is presented below:
Fig. 3

Multiplex PCR with individual fluorescence-labeled primers for different Vibrio strains. a. Species-specific amplification of the flexible loop-encoding DNA sequence. Indicated amounts of individual genomic DNA (1: V. alginolyticus, 2: V. parahaemolyticus, 3: V. vulnificus) were added to the primer mix. PCR products were visualized in the agarose gel by the different fluorescence of the species-specific primers. Down to 10 pg of each DNA sample were readily detected, without any cross reactivity with the other genomes. N, negative control. b. Human DNA does not interfere with the specific detection of Vibrio DNA. 0.1 ng of genomic DNA of the indicated Vibrio strains were mixed with a 500 to 1000-fold excess (50 and 100 ng) of human genomic DNA in a multiplex PCR and visualized as above. Compared to the positive control (0, no human DNA added), no additional bands appeared, indicating an exclusive and highly specific amplification of Vibrio DNA only. N, negative control with 50 ng of human genomic DNA

Reference

  1. 1.
    Franz et al. BMC Microbiol (2016) 16:47 doi  10.1186/s12866-016-0670-2

Copyright information

© The Author(s). 2016

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Biochemistry, Leipzig UniversityLeipzigGermany

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