Critical Care

, 11:P1 | Cite as

Infusion of sodium sulfide improves myocardial and endothelial function in a canine model of cardiopulmonary bypass

  • C Szabó
  • G Veres
  • T Radovits
  • M Karck
  • G Szabó
Poster presentation

Keywords

Sulfide Endothelial Function Cardiopulmonary Bypass Hydrogen Sulfide Sodiumnitroprusside 

Hydrogen sulfide is produced endogenously by a variety of enzymes involved in cysteine metabolism. Clinical data indicate that endogenous levels of hydrogen sulfide are diminished in various forms of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of hydrogen sulfide supplementation on cardiac function during reperfusion in a clinically relevant experimental model of cardiopulmonary bypass. Twelve anesthetized dogs underwent hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass. After 60 minutes of hypothermic cardiac arrest, reperfusion was started after application of either saline vehicle (control, n = 6), or the sodium sulfide infusion (1 mg/kg/hour, n = 6). Biventricular hemodynamic variables were measured by combined pressure–volume–conductance catheters. Coronary and pulmonary blood flow, vasodilator responses to acetylcholine and sodiumnitroprusside and pulmonary function were also determined. Administration of sodium sulfide led to a significantly better recovery of left and right ventricular systolic function (P < 0.05) after 60 minutes of reperfusion. Coronary blood flow was also significantly higher in the sodium sulfide-treated group (P < 0.05). Sodium sulfide treatment improved coronary blood flow, and preserved the acetylcholine-induced increases in coronary and pulmonary blood (P < 0.05). Myocardial ATP levels were markedly improved in the sulfide-treated group. Thus, supplementation of sulfide improves the recovery of myocardial and endothelial function and energetic status after hypothermic cardiac arrest during cardiopulmonary bypass. These beneficial effects occurred without any detectable adverse hemodynamic or cardiovascular effects of sulfide at the dose used in the current study.

Copyright information

© BioMed Central Ltd. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • C Szabó
    • 1
  • G Veres
    • 2
  • T Radovits
    • 2
  • M Karck
    • 2
  • G Szabó
    • 2
  1. 1.Ikaria IncSeattleUSA
  2. 2.University of HeidelbergGermany

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