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Dominance and nondominance of the radial scar/complex sclerosing lesion and associated pathology

  • D Birchley
  • JR Steel
  • PA Jones
  • CS Holgate
  • RM Watkins
Oral Presentation
  • 2.6k Downloads

Keywords

Carcinoma Cancer Research Histological Type Invasive Carcinoma Atypical Hyperplasia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Aim

To establish whether there is a significant difference in the pathology associated with radial scars (RS) or complex sclerosing lesions (CSL).

Patients and methods

RS or CSL were recorded in 178 specimens over a 17-year period. Three associated pathologies were noted – atypical hyperplasia, in situ malignancy and invasive carcinoma. The sclerosing lesions were categorised as to whether the RS/CSL was dominant (i.e. larger than the associated pathology) or nondominant (smaller than the associated pathology).

Results

Sixty-four patients (36%) had RS/CSL with associated pathology: atypical hyperplasia (17), in situ (24) or invasive (23) malignancy. There was a significant (P < 0.001, chi-square 17.5) difference in proportions for histological types between lesions where the RS/CSL was dominant and lesions where they were not. Lesions with a dominant RS/CSL were associated with significantly more in situ malignancy and atypical hyperplasia. Invasive carcinoma was associated with nondominant RS/CSL.

Conclusion

The nature of the associated pathology appears to be related to the dominance or nondominance of the RS/CSL.

Table 1

 

RS/CSL dominant

 
 

Yes

No

Total

Associated pathology

   

   ADH/ALH

17

0

17

   In situ

15

9

24

   Invasive

7

16

23

Total

39

25

64

Copyright information

© BioMed Central 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • D Birchley
    • 1
  • JR Steel
    • 1
  • PA Jones
    • 1
  • CS Holgate
    • 1
  • RM Watkins
    • 1
  1. 1.Derriford HospitalPlymouthUK

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