Earth, Planets and Space

, Volume 56, Issue 12, pp 1323–1330 | Cite as

The slip-rate along the northern Itoigawa-Shizuoka tectonic line active fault system, central Japan

Open Access
Article

Abstract

The slip-rates on the northern extent of Itoigawa-Shizuoka tectonic line (ISTL) are estimated based on seismic reflection profiles, drill core data and analysis of tectonic geomorphology. The ISTL is a major tectonic line that passes through the Honshu Island of Japan, and its northern and central segments form an active fault system characterized by high slip-rates. In the Kamishiro basin, near the northern end of the ISTL active fault system, the rate of net slip is estimated to be 4.4–5.4 m/kyr over the last 28 ka, with a vertical-separation-rate of 2.2–2.7 m/kyr. In the Omachi area, south of the Kamishiro basin, the Quaternary slip-rate is estimated to be at least 2.9 m/kyr based on the balanced cross-section derived from reflection profiles and surface geology. The dip angle of 30° determined from the Omachi seismic profile suggests a vertical-separation-rate of at least 1.5 m/kyr. Based on compiled evidence from the available geomorphological and paleo-seismological data, vertical-slip-rates of 1.0–2.9 m/kyr are inferred for the region between Hakuba and Toyoshina over the past 3 ka. The northern ISTL exhibits dip-slip-rate of at least 2.9 m/kyr, with a constant average slip-rate of 2.0–5.8 m/kyr since the Early Quaternary. A paleoseismological data and long-term slip-rate along the northern ISTL has potential for a large earthquake.

Key words

Northern Itoigawa-Shizuoka tectonic line active fault tectonic geomorphology slip-rate 

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Copyright information

© The Society of Geomagnetism and Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences (SGEPSS); The Seismological Society of Japan; The Volcanological Society of Japan; The Geodetic Society of Japan; The Japanese Society for Planetary Sciences. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nobuhisa Matsuta
    • 1
  • Yasutaka Ikeda
    • 2
  • Hiroshi Sato
    • 1
  1. 1.Earthquake Research InstituteUniversity of TokyoBunkyo-ku, TokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Earth and Planetary ScienceUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan

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