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Earth, Planets and Space

, Volume 52, Issue 11, pp 1009–1013 | Cite as

Detectability for GPS, EDM and tiltmeters of the Hot Springs Research Institute in the western Kanagawa prefecture, Japan

Open Access
Letter
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Abstract

To better understanding the observation data, we attempt to assess the detectability for the crustal deformation observation network of the Hot Springs Research Institute of Kanagawa prefecture (HSRI). The HSRI has carried out continuous monitoring of crustal deformation with GPS, EDM, borehole tiltmeters, groundwater leveling since 1989. Our observation purpose is to detect the pre-, co- and post-seismic deformations of the hypothetical M7 class earthquake designated as the “Western Kanagawa Prefecture Earthquake (WKE)”. In order to estimate the detectability, weapplya simple calculation method, thatiscomparing between co-seismic deformation (displacement and tilt) and the accuracy of observation instruments. Co-seismic deformation is calculated using the Okada’s method, which is a formulation of the expected crustal deformation due to seismic faulting as a function of an earthquake magnitude and a hypocentral distance without assuming focal mechanism. It is indicated that the highest detectability area is located in the center of our HSRI observation network. Comparing detectability contour maps for several kinds of networks, we can find that the detectability of the co-seismic deformation by the tiltmeter network is higher than those by the GPS and EDM networks in the case of the M5 class earthquake with a focal depth of 10 km, and that the detectability by the GPS network is almost equal to that by the EDM network in the case of the M6 class earthquake with a focal depth of shallower than 15 km. For M4 class earthquakes, it is difficult for the GPS, EDM and tiltmeter networks to detect co-seismic deformation. The present result shows advantageous characteristics of the HSRI geodetic network and an important constraint on investigating the pre-, co- and post-seismic deformation of the WKE. To monitor the pre-, co- and post-seismic deformation of the WKE, it is necessary to combine these observations in the most effective way.

Keywords

Focal Depth Crustal Deformation Hypocentral Distance Seismic Fault Kanagawa Prefecture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© The Society of Geomagnetism and Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences (SGEPSS); The Seismological Society of Japan; The Volcanological Society of Japan; The Geodetic Society of Japan; The Japanese Society for Planetary Sciences. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hot Springs Research Institute of Kanagawa PrefectureKanagawaJapan

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