Academic Psychiatry

, Volume 37, Issue 5, pp 317–320 | Cite as

A Curriculum in Measurement-Based Care: Screening and Monitoring of Depression in a Psychiatric Resident Clinic

  • Melissa R. Arbuckle
  • Michael Weinberg
  • Susan C. Kistler
  • Deborah L. Cabaniss
  • Abby J. Isaacs
  • Lloyd I. Sederer
  • Susan M. Essock
Brief Report

Abstract

Objective

The goal of this curriculum was to train residents in measurement-based care (MBC).

Method

Third-year psychiatry residents were educated in MBC through didactic seminars and a quality-improvement (QI) initiative with the goal of implementing the Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Scale (PHQ-9) to screen and monitor patients for symptoms of depression.

Results

Residents suggested strategies for integrating the PHQ-9 into the clinic. Over the first 6 months, residents showed an increase in rate of depression screening from 4% to 92% of patients. Also, they increased monthly monitoring of outpatients with a diagnosis of depression from 1% to 76%. Residents who used the PHQ-9 to monitor patients with depression were significantly more likely to use additional standardized assessments.

Conclusions

Combining an educational intervention with QI strategies can significantly affect residents’ use of standardized assessments in an outpatient setting. Using standardized measures allows residents to assess their own clinical effectiveness, an emerging priority in training.

Keywords

Academic Psychiatry Standardize Assessment Electronic Medical Record System York State Psychiatric Institute Front Desk 

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Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melissa R. Arbuckle
    • 1
    • 3
  • Michael Weinberg
    • 1
    • 2
  • Susan C. Kistler
    • 1
  • Deborah L. Cabaniss
    • 1
    • 3
  • Abby J. Isaacs
    • 2
  • Lloyd I. Sederer
    • 4
  • Susan M. Essock
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Dept. of PsychiatryColumbia UniversityNew York
  2. 2.Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, Inc. (MW, AJI)USA
  3. 3.New York State Psychiatric Institute (MRA, DLC, SME)UK
  4. 4.New York State Office of Mental Health (LIS)UK

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