Triggered single photons and entangled photons from a quantum dot microcavity

  • M. Pelton
  • C. Santori
  • G.S. Solomon
  • O. Benson
  • Y. Yamamoto
  • 133 Downloads

Abstract:

Current quantum cryptography systems are limited by the attenuated coherent pulses they use as light sources: a security loophole is opened up by the possibility of multiple-photon pulses. By replacing the source with a single-photon emitter, transmission rates of secure information can be improved. We have investigated the use of single self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots as such single-photon sources, and have seen a tenfold reduction in the multi-photon probability as compared to Poissonian pulses. An extension of our experiment should also allow for the generation of triggered, polarization-entangled photon pairs. The utility of these light sources is currently limited by the low efficiency with which photons are collected. However, by fabricating an optical microcavity containing a single quantum dot, the spontaneous emission rate into a single mode can be enhanced. Using this method, we have seen 78% coupling of single-dot radiation into a single cavity resonance. The enhanced spontaneous decay should also allow for higher photon pulse rates, up to about 3 GHz.

PACS. 78.67.Hc Quantum dots – 42.50.Dv Nonclassical field states; squeezed, antibunched, and sub-Poissonian states; operational definitions of the phase of the field; phase measurements – 73.21.-b Electron states and collective excitations in multilayers, quantum wells, mesoscopic, and nanoscale systems 

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Copyright information

© EDP Sciences, Springer-Verlag, Società Italiana di Fisica 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Pelton
    • 1
  • C. Santori
    • 1
  • G.S. Solomon
    • 1
  • O. Benson
    • 2
  • Y. Yamamoto
    • 1
  1. 1.Quantum Entanglement Project, ICORP, JST, E. L. Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford CA-94305, USAUS
  2. 2.Physics Department, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstrasse 10, 78464 Konstanz, GermanyDE

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