Advertisement

The European Physical Journal A

, Volume 32, Issue 1, pp 25–29 | Cite as

On the unusual properties of the 282 keV state in 135Sb

  • A. Korgul
  • H. Mach
  • B. A. Brown
  • A. Covello
  • A. Gargano
  • B. Fogelberg
  • W. Kurcewicz
  • E. Werner-Malento
  • R. Orlandi
  • M. Sawicka
Regular Article - Nuclear Structure and Reactions

Abstract.

Recently the first excited state in 135Sb has been observed at the unexpectedly low excitation energy of only 282keV and interpreted as mainly d 5/2 proton coupled to the 134Sn core. Based on theoretical considerations it was suggested that its low excitation energy is related to a relative shift of the proton d 5/2 and g 7/2 orbits induced by the neutron excess. We have measured the lifetime of the 282keV state by the advanced time-delayed βγγ(t) method. The measured half-life, T 1/2 = 6.1(4)ns, yields exceptionally low limits of B(M1;5/21 +→7/21 +)≤3.0×10-4 μ 2 N and B(E2;5/21 +→7/21 +)≤54e 2 fm 4. These strongly hindered M1 and slow E2 transition rates are similar to those for the transition de-populating the first excited state at 405keV in 211Bi. Results of shell model calculations with realistic interactions are presented. The M1 decay rate was found to be extremely sensistive both to the wave function and to the M1 effective operator.

PACS.

21.10.Tg Lifetimes 23.40.-s β decay; double β decay; electron and muon capture 21.60.Cs Shell model 27.60.+j 90≤A≤149 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    J. Dobaczewski, Phys. Rev. C 53, 2809 (1996).CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    P. Bhattacharyya, Eur. Phys. J. A 3, 109 (1998).CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    C.T. Zhang, Z. Phys. A 358, 9 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    A. Korgul, Phys. Rev. C 64, 021302(R) (2001).CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    J. Shergur, Phys. Rev. C 65, 034313 (2002).CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    J. Shergur, Phys. Rev. C 72, 024305 (2005).CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    M. Sanchez-Vega, Phys. Rev. C 60, 024303 (1999).CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    M.J. Martin, Nucl. Data Sheets 63, 723 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    E. Browne, Nucl. Data Sheets 99, 483 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    A. Artna-Cohen, Nucl. Data Sheets 63, 79 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    H. Mach, in Key Topics in Nuclear Structure, Proceedings of the 8th International Spring Seminar on Nuclear Physics, Paestum, 2004, edited by A. Covello (World Scientific, Singapore, 2005) p. 205.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    A. Korgul, Eur. Phys. J. A 25, s01, 123 (2005).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    H. Mach, Nucl. Phys. A 523, 197 (1991) and references therein.CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    R. Machleidt, Phys. Rev. C 63, 024001 (2001).CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    S. Bogner, Phys. Rev. C 65, 051301(R) (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    T.T.S. Kuo, E. Osnes, Lect. Notes Phys. 364 (1990).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    F. Andreozzi, Phys. Rev. C 56, R16 (1997).Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    L. Coraggio, Phys. Rev. C 65, 051306(R) (2002).CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    L. Coraggio, A. Covello, A. Gargano, N. Itaco, Phys. Rev. C 72, 057302 (2005).CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    A. Covello, L. Coraggio, A. Gargano, N. Itaco, to be published in Prog. Part. Nucl. Phys.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    L. Coraggio, A. Covello, A. Gargano, N. Itaco, Phys. Rev. C 73, 031302(R) (2006).CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    R. Machleidt, Phys. Rev. C 53, R1483 (1996).Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    B.A. Brown, Phys. Rev. C 71, 044317 (2005)CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Società Italiana di Fisica and Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Korgul
    • 1
  • H. Mach
    • 2
    • 3
  • B. A. Brown
    • 4
  • A. Covello
    • 5
  • A. Gargano
    • 5
  • B. Fogelberg
    • 3
  • W. Kurcewicz
    • 1
  • E. Werner-Malento
    • 1
  • R. Orlandi
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • M. Sawicka
    • 1
    • 9
  1. 1.Institute of Experimental PhysicsWarsaw UniversityWarsawPoland
  2. 2.Institute for Structure and Nuclear AstrophysicsUniversity of Notre DameNotre DameUSA
  3. 3.Department of Nuclear and Particle PhysicsUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden
  4. 4.Department of Physics and Astronomy and National Superconducting Cyclotron LaboratoryMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  5. 5.Dipartimento di Scienze FisicheUniversità di Napoli Federico II and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica NucleareNapoliItaly
  6. 6.Institute Laue-LangevinGrenoble Cedex 9France
  7. 7.Department of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of ManchesterUK
  8. 8.INFN Laboratori Nazionali di LegnaroLegnaroItaly
  9. 9.K.U. Leuven, IKSLeuvenBelgium

Personalised recommendations