Advertisement

Catalysis in Industry

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 91–98 | Cite as

Dynamic capacity of desiccants based on modified alumina at elevated pressures

  • R. A. Zotov
  • L. A. Isupova
  • V. V. Danilevich
  • A. A. Babina
  • A. N. Sinel’nikov
  • E. P. Meshcheryakov
  • I. A. Kurzina
General Problems of Catalysis

Abstract

Alumina desiccants obtained by extrusion molding of plastic pastes based on pseudoboehmite or bayerite-containing hydroxides including those modified by sodium and potassium ions were studied. The hydroxides were synthesized by hydration of the product of centrifugal thermal activation of gibbsite under mild conditions. The physicochemical and structural-mechanical properties of the desiccants (fresh and after nine adsorption–regeneration cycles) were studied. The dynamic capacity was determined at a pressure of 3MPa under conditions designed to model the industrial conditions. The sample obtained from bayeritecontaining hydroxide had a higher dynamic capacity than the sample obtained from pseudoboehmite-containing hydroxide at close texture and strength characteristics of adsorbents. Modification of the samples obtained from pseudoboehmite-containing hydroxide with potassium and sodium ions leads to decreased granule stability and increased volume, average pore size, and dynamic capacity. The potassium-modified sample of the desiccant had dynamic capacity as high as that of the sample obtained from bayerite-containing hydroxide at low load. After the cyclic tests, the phase composition, alkaline impurity contents, specific surface area, and crushing strength of the samples did not change within the error of determination. It was found that the prepared desiccants were highly stable in many adsorption–desorption cycles and the minimum dew point of –80°C could be reached during the drying.

Keywords

dehydration of associated petroleum gas alumina modification dynamic capacity at elevated pressures 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Byk, S.Sh., Makagon, Yu.F., and Fomina, V.I., Gazovye gidraty (Gas Hydrates), Moscow Khimiya, 1980.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    SIBUR Official Website. http://www.sibur.ru/Sibur-TumenGaz/about/history. Cited March 1, 2016.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Dabrowski, A., Adv. Colloid Interface Sci., 2001, vol. 93, nos. 1–3, pp. 135–224.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Sircar, S., Rao, M.B., and Golden, T.C., Stud. Surf. Sci. Catal., 1996, vol. 99, pp. 629–646.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Dzis’ko, V.A. Osnovy metodov prigotovleniya katalizatorov (Principles of Catalyst Preparation), Novosibirsk: Nauka, 1983.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Stiles, A.B., Catalyst Supports and Supported Catalysts: Theoretical and Applied Concepts, Boston Butterworth, 1987.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Sergunin, A.S., Simanenkov, S.I., and Gatapova, N.Ts., Vestn. Tver. Gos. Tekh. Univ., Ser. Khim., 2012, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 664–670.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Zotov, R.A., Glazyrin, A.A., Danilevich, V.V., Kharina, I.V., Zyuzin, D.A., Volodin, A.M., and Isupova, L.A., Kinet. Catal., 2012, vol. 53, no. 5, pp. 570–576. doi 10.1134/S0023158412050187CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Danilevich, V.V., Isupova, L.A., Kagyrmanova, A.P., Kharina, I.V., Zyuzin, D.A., and Noskov, A.S., Kinet. Catal., 2012, vol. 53, no. 5, pp. 632–639. doi 10.1134/S0023158412050059CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Danilevich, V.V., Isupova, L.A., Paukshtis, E.A., and Ushakov, V.A., Kinet. Catal., 2014, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 372–379. doi 10.1134/S0023158414030021CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Danilevich, V.V., Isupova, L.A., Danilova, I.G., Zotov, R.A., and Ushakov, V.A., Russ. J. Appl. Chem., 2016, vol. 89, no. 3, pp. 343–353. doi 10.1134/S1070427216030010CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Tolmachev, A.M., Adsorbtsiya gazov, parov i rastvorov (Adsorption of Gases, Vapors, and Solutions), Moscow Granitsa, 2012.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Shkrabina, R.A., Vorobiev, Yu.K., Moroz, E.M., Kambarova, T.D., and Levitskii, E.A., Kinet. Katal., 1981, vol. 22, pp. 1080–1081.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Fenelonov, V.B., Vvedenie v fizicheskuyu khimiyu formirovaniya supramolekulyarnoi struktury adsorbentov i katalizatorov (Introduction into the Physical Chemistry of the Formation of a Supramolecular Structure of Adsorbents and Catalysts), Novosibirsk Izd. Sib. Otd. Ross. Akad. Nauk, 2004.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Zotov, R.A., Babina, A.A., Sinel’nikov, A.N., and Kurzina, I.A., Vestn. Tomsk. Gos. Univ., Khim., 2015, no. 2, pp. 14–19.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Chesnokov, V.V., Paukshtis, E.A., Buyanov, R.A., Krivoruchko, O.P., Zolotovskii, B.P., and Prokudina, N.A., Kinet. Catal., 1987, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 566–570.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Prokudina, N.A., Chesnokov, V.V., Paukshtis, E.A., and Buyanov, R.A., Kinet. Catal., 1989, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 835–839.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Zotov
    • 2
  • L. A. Isupova
    • 3
  • V. V. Danilevich
    • 3
  • A. A. Babina
    • 2
  • A. N. Sinel’nikov
    • 2
  • E. P. Meshcheryakov
    • 1
  • I. A. Kurzina
    • 1
  1. 1.Tomsk State UniversityTomskRussia
  2. 2.NIOSTTomskRussia
  3. 3.Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian BranchRussian Academy of SciencesNovosibirskRussia

Personalised recommendations