Glass Physics and Chemistry

, Volume 40, Issue 3, pp 288–290 | Cite as

Temperature sensors based on silicate porous glasses impregnated by organic compounds

  • V. D. Gavrichev
  • A. L. Dmitriev
  • I. N. Anfimova
  • E. I. Kotova
  • E. M. Nikushchenko
  • T. V. Antropova
Article

Abstract

The spectral dependences of light transmission of samples of silicate porous glasses impregnated by anaesthesine and tribenzylamine have been studied in a visible range at temperatures below and above the solid-liquid phase transition point of these substances. The principle of the action of the fiber-optic threshold temperature sensor with the functional element from porous glass has been considered. The possibility of the effective use of impregnated porous glasses has been demonstrated for the developments of fully dielectric fiber-optic temperature sensors dedicated to industrial monitoring systems, as well as fire-alarm elements.

Keywords

porous glass fiber optics light scattering phase transition temperature 

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. D. Gavrichev
    • 1
  • A. L. Dmitriev
    • 1
  • I. N. Anfimova
    • 2
  • E. I. Kotova
    • 1
  • E. M. Nikushchenko
    • 1
  • T. V. Antropova
    • 2
  1. 1.National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and OpticsSt. PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.Grebenshchikov Institute of Silicate ChemistryRussian Academy of SciencesSt. PetersburgRussia

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