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Geology of Ore Deposits

, Volume 55, Issue 8, pp 663–668 | Cite as

Lahnsteinite, Zn4(SO4)(OH)6 · 3H2O, a new mineral from the Friedrichssegen Mine, Germany

  • N. V. Chukanov
  • R. K. Rastsvetaeva
  • S. M. Aksenov
  • I. V. Pekov
  • D. I. Belakovskiy
  • G. Blass
  • G. Möhn
Article

Abstract

A new mineral, lahnsteinite, has been found in the dump of the Friedrichssegen Mine, Bad Ems district, Rhineland-Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz), Germany. Lahnsteinite, occurring as colorless tabular crystals in the cavities of goethite, is associated with pyromorphite, hydrozincite, quartz, and native copper. The Mohs’ hardness is 1.5; the cleavage is perfect parallel to (001). D calc = 2.995 g/cm3, D meas = 2.98(2) g/cm3. The IR spectrum is given. The new mineral is optically biaxial, negative, α = 1.568(2), β = 1.612(2), γ = 1.613(2), 2V meas = 18(3)°, 2V calc = 17°. The chemical composition (wt %, electron microprobe data; H2O was determined by gas chromatography of ignition products) is as follows: 3.87 FeO, 1.68 CuO, 57.85 ZnO, 15.83 SO3, 22.3 H2O, total is 101.53. The empirical formula is (Zn3.3Fe0.27Cu0.11)Σ3.91(S0.98O4)(OH)5 · 3H2.10O. The crystal structure has been studied on a single crystal. Lahnsteinite is triclinic, space group P1, a = 8.3125(6), b = 14.545(1), c = 18.504(2) Å, α = 89.71(1), β = 90.05(1), γ = 90.13(1)°, V = 2237.2(3) Å3, Z = 8. The strong reflections in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern [d, Å (I, %)] are: 9.30 (100), 4.175 (18), 3.476 (19), 3.290 (19), 2.723 (57), 2.624 (36), 2.503 (35), 1.574 (23). The mineral has been named after its type locality near the town of Lahnstein. The type specimen of lahnsteinite is deposited in the Fersman Mineralogical Museum of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, registration number 4252/1.

Keywords

Goethite Unit Cell Dimension Zinc Sulfate Lower Devonian Native Copper 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. V. Chukanov
    • 1
  • R. K. Rastsvetaeva
    • 2
  • S. M. Aksenov
    • 2
  • I. V. Pekov
    • 3
  • D. I. Belakovskiy
    • 4
  • G. Blass
    • 5
  • G. Möhn
    • 6
  1. 1.Institute of Problems of Chemical PhysicsRussian Academy of SciencesChernogolovka, Moscow oblastRussia
  2. 2.Institute of CrystallographyRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  3. 3.Faculty of GeologyMoscow State UniversityMoscowRussia
  4. 4.Fersman Mineralogical MuseumRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  5. 5.EschweilerGermany
  6. 6.NiedernhausenGermany

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