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Russian Journal of Applied Chemistry

, Volume 89, Issue 6, pp 943–948 | Cite as

Characteristics of polyether urethanes with mixed soft segments, prepared by two- and three-step procedures

  • V. V. Tereshatov
  • A. I. Slobodinyuk
  • M. A. Makarova
  • Zh. A. Vnutskikh
  • A. V. Pinchuk
  • V. Yu. Senichev
Macromolecular Compounds and Polymeric Materials

Abstract

A three-step procedure for preparing polyurethanes with mixed polyether segments was suggested. It involves preparation of the “inverse” prepolymer by the reaction of one of oligodiisocyanates with 1,4-butanediol taken in a double excess, followed by the reaction with the other oligodiisocyanate. Polyurethanes with alternating poly(tetramethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide) soft segments were prepared by this procedure. Such materials surpass polyurethanes prepared from a mixture of oligodiisocyanates in the strength and softening point of the hard phase. In contrast to poly(tetramethylene oxide) urethane, elastomers with mixed polyether segments do not crystallize.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. V. Tereshatov
    • 1
  • A. I. Slobodinyuk
    • 1
  • M. A. Makarova
    • 1
  • Zh. A. Vnutskikh
    • 1
  • A. V. Pinchuk
    • 1
  • V. Yu. Senichev
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Technical Chemistry, Ural BranchRussian Academy of SciencesPermRussia

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