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Semiconductors

, Volume 52, Issue 1, pp 6–11 | Cite as

Investigation of a Polariton Condensate in Micropillars in a High Magnetic Field

  • A. V. Chernenko
  • A. S. Brichkin
  • S. I. Novikov
  • C. Schneider
  • S. Hoefling
XXI International Symposium “Nanophysics And Nanoelectronics”, Nizhny Novgorod, March 13–16, 2017
  • 18 Downloads

Abstract

The photoluminescence of a nonequilibrium polariton condensate in cylindrical and rectangular micropillars etched on the surface of a high-Q GaAs microcavity is investigated in magnetic fields of up to 12 T. The measurements are carried out under different levels of nonresonant optical pumping with nanosecond laser pulses for a wide range of cavity detuning. As far as nonresonant excitation produces a high density of excitons in a reservoir, it should be expected that the exciton–polariton interaction, which depends on the pump level, has a considerable effect on the Zeeman splitting and polarization of the condensate. However, measurements of the Zeeman splitting and polarization in high magnetic fields demonstrate that only minor changes take place up to the highest available pump levels. This means that, in the case under study, the effect of exciton–polariton interaction on the polariton system is insignificant. At the same time, the data obtained provide an estimate for the exciton density in the reservoir. In contrast to cylindrical micropillars, the photoluminescence of the condensate in rectangular micropillars consists of two perpendicularly linearly polarized lines which retain a high degree of linear polarization even in a field as high as 12 T. The Zeeman splitting in this case is nearly independent of the pump power. The degrees of both circular and linear polarization change with pump power, but these changes are noticeably smaller than the ones predicted theoretically. This indicates that the system of polaritons in micropillars deviates considerably from thermodynamic equilibrium.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. V. Chernenko
    • 1
  • A. S. Brichkin
    • 1
  • S. I. Novikov
    • 1
  • C. Schneider
    • 2
  • S. Hoefling
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Solid State PhysicsRussian Academy of SciencesChernogolovkaRussia
  2. 2.Technische Physik, Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen Research Center for Complex Material SystemsUniversitat Wuerzburg, Am HublandWuerzburgGermany

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