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Entomological Review

, Volume 98, Issue 1, pp 49–75 | Cite as

Contribution to the Microlepidoptera Fauna of the South of Krasnoyarsk Territory and the Republic of Khakassia

  • E. N. Akulov
  • N. I. Kirichenko
  • M. G. Ponomarenko
Article
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Abstract

This paper provides a list of 125 species from 22 families of Microlepidoptera collected in the south of Krasnoyarsk Territory and in the Republic ofKhakassia, with 63 species (50%) and 2 families (Bucculatricidae and Elachistidae) recorded in the region for the first time, and 11 species from 6 families being new to Siberia: Cauchas fibulella, Nemophora fasciella, N. minimella (Adelidae), Phyllonorycter sorbicola, Phyllocnistis extrematrix (Gracillariidae), Cosmiotes freyerella, Elachista subocellea (Elachistidae), Caryocolum alsinella, Scrobipalpula diffluella (Gelechiidae), Agonopterix intersecta (Depressariidae), and Ypsolopha horridella (Ypsolophidae). Three species are new to science: Phyllonorycter sp. and Phyllocnistis verae (Gracillariidae) from the suburbs of Krasnoyarsk and Chrysoesthia sp. (Gelechiidae) from the Republic of Khakassia. Almost half of the faunistic findings belong to two families, Gelechiidae (34 species) and Gracillariidae (24 species). In the former family, the number of species distributed in Krasnoyarsk Territory and/or Khakassia was increased by 1.5 times based on our collection. Trophic specialization remains unknown only for 7 of the 125 species. Most (90%) of the remaining 118 species are phytophagous, the others are saprophagous; 53 species are known as leaf miners. Phytophagous species feed on plants of 36 families and 21 orders. The largest number of microlepidopteran species inhabit plants of the orders Rosales and Fagales (25 and 24 species, respectively). Twelve species are known as pests: Tineidae (4 species), Gracillariidae, Gelechiidae (2 species in each), Argyresthiidae, Choreutidae, Lyonetiidae, and Plutellidae (one species in each). Four pest species have expanded beyond the Palaearctic in the last century: Choreutis pariana (Choreutidae), Scrobipalpa atriplicella (Gelechiidae), Plutella xylostella (Plutellidae), and Niditinea fuscella (Tineidae).

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© Pleiades Publishing, Inc. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. N. Akulov
    • 1
  • N. I. Kirichenko
    • 2
    • 3
  • M. G. Ponomarenko
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Russian Plant Quarantine CenterKrasnoyarsk BranchKrasnoyarskRussia
  2. 2.Sukachev Institute of Forest, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of SciencesFederal Research Center “Krasnoyarsk Science Center SB RAS,”KrasnoyarskRussia
  3. 3.Siberian Federal UniversityKrasnoyarskRussia
  4. 4.Federal Research Center for East Asian Terrestrial BiodiversityFar Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of SciencesVladivostokRussia
  5. 5.Far Eastern Federal UniversityVladivostokRussia

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