Method for Predicting the Stability Limit to Acoustic Oscillations in Liquid-Propellant Rocket Engine Combustion Chambers Based on Combustion Noise

Abstract

An experimental method for determining the critical pressure perturbations leading to acoustic instability in combustion chambers of liquid-propellant rocket engines has been developed and used to estimate the stability of the working process. The method involves statistical processing of recorded noise pressure pulsations near the natural resonant frequency range for all normal modes of acoustic oscillations in cylindrical combustion chambers and gas generators. The oscillation damping coefficient (decrement), characterizing the difference between the generated and dissipated energy, is used as a diagnostic criterion for predicting the stable or unstable states of a dynamic system. The method is based on the theory of self-oscillating dynamic systems and one-dimensional Markov random processes using the Fokker–Planck–Kolmogorov equation. Analysis of a nonlinear differential equation with a symmetrized stochastic right-hand side describing white noise for experimentally determined amplitudes of pressure pulsations and their statistical processing using Mera software allows the state of self-oscillating systems to be identified as stable or unstable. The method is “passive;" it is applicable without using standard external impulse disturbing devices.

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Correspondence to V. I. Biryukov.

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Biryukov, V.I., Ivanov, V.N. & Tsarapkin, R.A. Method for Predicting the Stability Limit to Acoustic Oscillations in Liquid-Propellant Rocket Engine Combustion Chambers Based on Combustion Noise. Combust Explos Shock Waves 57, 74–82 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1134/S0010508221010093

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Keywords

  • combustion noise
  • acoustic modes
  • damping decrement
  • self-oscillation
  • stability limit