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Inorganic Materials: Applied Research

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 652–657 | Cite as

Using Nickel Nanopowders with Different Morphologies for Fabrication of Highly Porous Nickel Materials

  • V. A. ZelenskyEmail author
  • A. B. Ankudinov
  • M. I. Alymov
  • N. M. RubtsovEmail author
  • I. V. Tregubova
  • N. V. Petrakova
COMPOSITE MATERIALS
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Abstract

We study the effects that the morphology of nickel nanopowders obtained by chemical metallurgy, nickel formate thermal decomposition, and wire electrical explosion has on the properties of porous samples fabricated from these nanopowders using the powder metallurgy method. Porous nickel samples are prepared from a mixture of nickel powder (30 vol %) and ammonium bicarbonate (70 vol %) by sintering in a flow of hydrogen at 700°C and under a pressure of 300 MPa. Samples fabricated from the nickel nanopowder obtained by the wire electrical explosion method have the highest total and open (65.8%) porosities. Samples fabricated from the other two types of nickel nanopowders have lower porosity.

Keywords:

porous materials nickel powder porosity compaction sintering structure X-ray diffraction 

Notes

FUNDING

This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant no. 17-03-00867) and the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) within Program 34P for Basic Research in the Russian Academy of Sciences. X-ray diffraction measurements and electron microscopy were funded from state assignment no. 007-00129-18-00.

CONFLICT OF INTERESTS

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. A. Zelensky
    • 1
    Email author
  • A. B. Ankudinov
    • 1
  • M. I. Alymov
    • 1
    • 2
  • N. M. Rubtsov
    • 2
    Email author
  • I. V. Tregubova
    • 1
  • N. V. Petrakova
    • 1
  1. 1.Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Merzhanov Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science, Russian Academy of SciencesChernogolovkaRussia

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